Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a writer and producer on the Newsdesk, in the heart of NPR's newsroom in Washington, D.C.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to being the lead writer and editor for online coverage of several Olympic Games, from London 2012 to Pyeongchang 2018. His assignments have included being the lead web producer for NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as establishing the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps on NPR.org.

In the past, Chappell has edited and coordinated digital features for Morning Edition and Fresh Air, in addition to editing the rundown of All Things Considered. He frequently contributes to other NPR blogs, such as All Tech Considered and The Salt.

In 2009, Chappell was a key editorial member of the small team that redesigned NPR's web site. One year later, NPR.org won its first Peabody Award, along with the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award.

At NPR, Chappell has trained both digital and radio staff to use digital tools to tell compelling stories, in addition to "evangelizing" — promoting more collaboration between legacy and digital departments.

Prior to joining NPR, Chappell was part of the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling coverage in areas from the Middle East, Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, and coordinating CNN's pool coverage on major events.

Chappell's work for CNN included editing digital video and producing web stories for SI.com. He also edited and produced stories for CNN.com's features division.

Before joining CNN, Chappell wrote about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies, in addition to his first job: editing the police blotter.

A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, Chappell attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

Recent models of Ford's F-150 pickup and Expedition SUV are included in a new recall from the Ford Motor Co., which says gear shift problems could lead drivers to think their vehicle is in park, even if that's not the case — and that "unintended vehicle movement" could occur.

The recall covers some 350,000 vehicles made for the 2018 model year that have 10-speed and 6-speed automatic transmissions.

Ford says it is "aware of one reported accident and injury related to this condition."

The Kremlin is crying foul on Facebook, accusing the social media giant of censorship after it took down more than 200 pages and accounts that were run by the Russia-based Internet Research Agency — the "troll factory" that is under indictment for interfering in the 2016 U.S. election.

Sixty American diplomats are leaving Russia on Thursday, meeting a deadline set when the Kremlin expelled them in retaliation for the U.S. expulsion of Russian diplomats. The tit-for-tat exchange is part of an international row over the poisoning of a former Russian spy in England.

"Three large buses and a minivan departed from the back gate of the U.S. Embassy in Moscow early Thursday morning," Charles Maynes reports for NPR's Newscast unit, "carrying American diplomats, their families, and the occasional family pet."

Updated at 5:26 p.m. ET

China's leaders followed President Trump in taking another step toward a new trade war, announcing a plan to put steep tariffs on $50 billion of U.S. imports. China's proposed 25 percent tariffs would target a wide range of American products, from soybeans and whiskey to airplanes and cars.

"China currently buys about $14 billion worth of American soybeans each year — almost a third of the entire U.S. crop," NPR's Dan Charles reports for our Newscast unit. "Prices for U.S. soybeans tumbled by 3 to 5 percent" on the news, Dan adds.

It started with a warning email last summer, from a security researcher who told Panera Bread that its website was exposing sensitive customer data. But after the problem went unfixed for months, the researcher went public with proof of the flaw. Another analyst said Panera's response was "half-baked."

Mexican Foreign Minister Luis Videgaray Caso is rejecting claims that his country allows "caravans" of migrants to pass into the U.S. — something President Trump accused Mexico of doing in a tweet this weekend. Defending Mexico, Videgaray added, "Facts clearly reflect this."

Videgaray's response came hours after Trump pointedly criticized Mexico on Sunday morning. The U.S. president devoted a series of tweets warning of "caravans" of people heading to the U.S. and he threatened to hurt Mexico economically and to build a wall along the border.

Updated at 4:40 p.m. ET

The suspected serial bomber who died north of Austin, Texas, on Wednesday morning was Mark Anthony Conditt, a 23-year-old who grew up in the area, public records show. Conditt died from an explosion that police say he triggered when a SWAT team was closing in on him.

Updated at 8:20 p.m. ET

The man police had identified as their top suspect in a string of deadly bombings in the Austin, Texas, area made a cellphone recording describing seven bombs he said he had constructed. Investigators discovered the message after the suspect killed himself early Wednesday by triggering an explosion in his car as officers approached the vehicle to make an arrest, police said Wednesday.

Officials identified him as 23-year-old Mark Anthony Conditt, from Pflugerville, Texas, outside Austin.

Updated at 11:15 p.m. ET

Another explosion in Austin, Texas, injured one person Tuesday night, but police confirmed that the explosion was unrelated to the previous package bombs that have killed two people and injured several others this month.

The explosion occurred after a "military-type memento" was dropped off at a Goodwill store on Austin's south side, Assistant Police Chief Ely Reyes said. He further described it as a 40mm artillery simulator.

Reyes said the simulator "initiated" at about 7 p.m. after being handled by a Goodwill employee.

The death of Nikolai Glushkov, the 68-year-old Russian businessman whose body was found in his London home on Monday, is being investigated as a murder. The cause of death was "compression to the neck," police say.

ProPublica is retracting parts of its story that linked Gina Haspel, President Trump's choice to lead the CIA, with the waterboarding of Abu Zubaydah, a suspected al-Qaida leader who was held at a secret "black site" prison in Thailand in 2002. The investigative newsroom cited new clarifications from CIA insiders as the reason for its correction. It also issued an apology.

From ProPublica:

"We at ProPublica hold government officials responsible for their missteps, and we must be equally accountable.

After one year in his job, national security adviser H.R. McMaster is expected to depart his White House position soon, U.S. officials tell NPR's Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman. Despite a denial from the Trump administration, the only thing that is reportedly holding up McMaster's departure is a transition plan.

McMaster's exit has been the subject of rumors, in a similar way that outgoing Secretary of State Rex Tillerson had been viewed as not long for life under President Trump. Officials say McMaster, 55, could leave within weeks, possibly within a month or so.

Updated at 9:50 a.m. ET

Russia says it will retaliate against Britain's recently announced sanctions, saying that President Vladimir Putin will soon decide the best way to respond to the U.K.'s expulsion of 23 Russian diplomats. It's the latest escalation in the clash between the two nations over the use of a military-grade nerve agent against a former Russian spy who is now a British citizen.

The U.K. is expelling 23 Russian diplomats as punishment for a chemical weapons attack that took place in England. Prime Minister Theresa May has said Russia was likely behind the poisoning of a former Russian spy who, along with his daughter, was exposed to a lethal nerve agent that was developed in Russia.

James Schwab has resigned from his job as a Department of Homeland Security spokesman, saying he didn't agree with Trump administration officials' use of "misleading facts" to attack Oakland Mayor Libby Schaaf after the mayor issued a warning about an immigration sweep in late February.

Updated at 3 p.m. ET

British Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson said Tuesday that Russia has "until midnight tonight" to explain how a lethal Novichok nerve agent that was developed in Russia came to be used on U.K. soil. Johnson said Britain is preparing to take "commensurate but robust" action.

A San Francisco fertility clinic says that a problem with the liquid nitrogen in one of its storage tanks may have damaged thousands of frozen eggs and embryos, triggering calls and letters to more than 400 concerned patients of the Pacific Fertility Center.

Updated at 3 a.m. ET Thursday

The U.S. women's hockey team owns Olympic gold for the first time in 20 years, after breaking Canada's remarkable streak of success in a gripping final at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. The only previous U.S. win had come in the tournament's first year, in 1998.

When the American women finally received their gold medals, they were placed on their necks by former player Angela Ruggiero, who was on the last U.S. Olympic team to win it all.

Updated at 9:45 a.m. ET

The U.S. women's ice hockey team dismantled Finland in their semifinals matchup at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics on Monday, scoring goals early and often and claiming a spot in the gold medal game, where they will face Canada.

The U.S. team scored two goals in each of the first two periods; a pair of scores came in less than one minute in the second period.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport has confirmed that it has begun proceedings against Russian curler Aleksandr Krushelnitckii, who won a bronze medal in curling as part of the Olympic Athletes from Russia team at the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics.

Krushelnitckii finished third in the mixed-doubles curling tournament, competing with his wife and teammate, Anastasia Bryzgalova.

The Court of Arbitration for Sport has affirmed a decision that 47 Russian athletes and coaches should not be allowed to participate in the Winter Olympics, weighing in on the matter with just hours to go before Pyeongchang holds its opening ceremony for nearly 3,000 athletes from around the world.

The group of 47 who were turned away includes Victor Ahn, a short track speed skater who has won multiple gold medals in previous Olympics, including in Sochi.

The opening ceremony of the Winter Olympics kicked off on Friday — at 8 p.m. in South Korea and at 6 a.m. ET in the U.S. — with 2,900 athletes from 92 countries gathering to compete for 102 medals in Pyeongchang.

The U.S. Olympic team was led into Pyeongchang Olympic Stadium by flag-bearer Erin Hamlin.

The Winter Games run from Feb. 9-25. The Paralympics will use many of the same facilities, with 670 athletes competing from March 9-18.

Our recap of the big event:

The ceremony begins

Team USA is bringing more athletes to Pyeongchang (242) than any nation ever has to a Winter Olympics. This year's team is also the most diverse of any U.S. winter squad, in terms of both race and gender: The 108 women on the 2018 team are the most of any U.S. team at a Winter Games.

The 242 athletes who will represent the U.S. in the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics come from 32 states, from Alaska to Florida. And while powerhouse winter sports states like Colorado and California are sending the most Olympians to South Korea, cities and towns around the U.S. have good reason to watch their daughters and sons compete as well.

The opening ceremony for the Pyeongchang Winter Olympics will take place Friday, but the first competitions are already underway. The U.S. curling team of Matt and Becca Hamilton led off a mixed doubles tournament by defeating a team from Russia.

There was a smattering of applause for each team as they were announced. The loudest cheers were reserved for the host South Korean team, which was also on the ice as part of the mixed-doubles tournament at the Gangneung Curling Center.

When cold weather becomes a main topic at the Winter Olympics, it's safe to say that frigid temperatures have made an impression. That's the case in Pyeongchang, where brutal cold and high winds have been a common theme for both the media and for athletes.

The U.S. has named 96 Russian billionaires to its blacklist of more than 200 influential Russians, issuing its "List of Oligarchs" along with documents that were required by last year's sanctions. As it submitted the list to Congress, the Trump administration also told lawmakers it won't seek new sanctions, saying that existing punishments for Moscow's interference in U.S. elections are having an effect.

While a number of top Russian politicians are on the list, it doesn't include one prominent name: that of Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Updated at 11:17 a.m. ET

Health care costs are "a hungry tapeworm on the American economy," Berkshire Hathaway Chairman and CEO Warren Buffett says, and now his firm is teaming up with Amazon and JPMorgan Chase to create a new company with the goal of providing high-quality health care for their U.S. employees at a lower cost.

Locations and activity of U.S. military bases; jogging and patrol routes of American soldiers — experts say those details are among the GPS data shared by the exercise tracking company Strava, whose Heat Map reflects more than a billion exercise activities globally. The Pentagon says it's looking at adding new training and policies to address security concerns.

The International Paralympic Committee won't allow Russia to compete in the upcoming PyeongChang 2018 Paralympic Winter Games, maintaining a ban that punished a widespread system of doping. Citing anti-doping reforms, the committee said some Russian athletes will be able to compete in a handful of sports — but they'll do so under a neutral flag, as their national committee remains suspended.

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