Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

The Senate in predominately Roman Catholic Argentina has rejected a law that would have legalized abortion, rebuffing a grass-roots abortion-rights movement.

Senate lawmakers voted 38 to 31 against the measure, which would have allowed abortion for the first 14 weeks of pregnancy.

Updated at 4 a.m. ET

Bowing to congressional pressure, the Trump administration has announced new sanctions to punish Russia for a nerve agent attack in the U.K. on former spy Sergei Skripal.

A top Syrian weapons engineer killed over the weekend when a bomb in his car exploded was the victim of a targeted assassination by Israel's spy agency, The New York Times reports.

California Gov. Jerry Brown says his state is in "uncharted territory" with the current slew of intense wildfires and he warns that climate change has made the situation "part of our ordinary experience."

"[The] predictions that I see, the more serious predictions of warming and fires to occur later in the century, 2040 or 2050, they're now occurring in real time," Brown said at a news conference on Wednesday in Sacramento.

"You can expect that — unfortunately — to continue intensifying in California and throughout the Southwest. We are part of that process," he said.

As firefighters continued to gain ground on the massive Carr Fire in Northern California and the Ferguson Fire to the south that has threatened Yosemite National Park, new blazes were erupting to threaten homes and lives elsewhere in the state.

North of San Francisco, residents from about 60 homes were evacuated as a fire near the Mendocino National Forest erupted late Tuesday. That fire was only about 40 miles north of twin blazes in Mendocino and Lake counties that took off earlier this week and together pose a threat to some 12,000 homes.

More Americans will be writing a check to the IRS in April because their employers are not withholding enough from their paychecks following the new tax law, the Government Accountability Office says in a new report.

U.K. cyclist Geraint Thomas crossed the Tour de France finish line on the Champs-Élysées Sunday to become the first Welshman to take the honor.

Thomas, 32, wearing the yellow jersey of the overall leader crossed the line arm-in-arm with teammate Chris Froome, last year's winner. Sunday's ceremonial final stage came after Thomas's Saturday defense of a 1 minute, 51 seconds lead over second-place finisher Tom Dumoulin. Four-time champion Froome placed third overall.

The spread of a deadly wildfire that has swept through Northern California in recent days, killing at least six people, showed some signs of slowing down on Sunday.

Entrepreneur Elon Musk and a British diver who helped rescue a dozen boys and their soccer coach from a cave in Thailand last week are engaged in a public spat over the specially designed minisubmarine that Musk offered to rescuers but was never used.

Updated at 7:28 a.m. ET

President Trump, in a wide-ranging interview with The Sun, said British Prime Minister Theresa May ignored his advice on Brexit, a move he said threatens to scuttle a trade deal with the U.S.

Updated at 1:03 p.m. ET

President Trump on Wednesday demanded that NATO allies increase defense spending immediately and double their current goal for burden-sharing in the defense alliance. As Trump gathered with leaders of NATO countries for a summit in Brussels, he also repeatedly said Germany's energy dependence on Russia undermines its independence.

Updated at 9:46 a.m. ET

At least 157 people are dead in western Japan and dozens are still missing after record rainfall that sparked flash floods and mudslides over the weekend, officials said, according to broadcaster NHK.

Updated at 11 a.m. ET

An elite team of Thai navy SEALs and foreign rescue divers brought out the final four boys and their soccer coach from a flooded cave near the Thai-Myanmar border, extracting the team through a labyrinth of tight passages after they spent two weeks trapped in darkness.

The operation on Tuesday moved quickly, raising hopes that all 12 boys and their adult coach from the Wild Boars soccer team would be at the surface by the end of the day.

North Korea is reportedly expanding a facility to build solid-fuel ballistic missiles — a further sign that despite last month's summit between President Trump and Kim Jong Un, Pyongyang is pressing ahead with its nuclear programs.

Updated at 10:15 a.m. ET

The man suspected of fatally shooting five people and wounding two others at the newsroom of the Capital Gazette in Annapolis, Md., had filed a lawsuit over the coverage by one of its publications, The Capital newspaper, of a criminal harassment charge against him.

The U.S. Forest Service has offered Nestlé a three-year permit to continue drawing millions of gallons of water from the San Bernardino National Forest.

Under the offer, Nestlé Waters North America — the largest bottled-water company in the country — will be allowed to keep taking water from the Strawberry Creek watershed. That watershed is currently rated as "impaired" and the extraction is to be allowed "when there is water available consistent with the forest's Land Management Plan," according to The Associated Press, citing the offer.

Former Ball State football player Wendell Brown has been sentenced in China to four years in prison on assault charges stemming from a 2016 bar fight in Chongqing.

Brown, 30, is a former linebacker for the Muncie, Indiana college, who later played for the Canadian Football League's Winnipeg Blue Bombers and Austria's Swarco Raiders. He was in China helping coach the Chongqing Dockers at the time of the altercation that landed him in jail.

Updated at 4:41 p.m. ET

The former director of security for the Senate intelligence committee appeared in federal court on Friday to face charges he lied to the FBI about his contacts with reporters.

In an indictment unsealed late Thursday, prosecutors charged James Wolfe with three counts of making false statements to federal authorities. Wolfe, 57, worked for the committee for nearly three decades under both Republican and Democratic leadership.

Wolfe did not enter a plea. He is expected to appear at another hearing next week in Washington.

In Germany's first-ever "Chancellor's Question Time," Angela Merkel fielded lawmakers' inquiries in the Bundestag on issues ranging from immigration to strained relations with Washington.

While it lacked the raucous free-for-all quality of the familiar British version of the tradition, Wednesday's session marked the first time the German chancellor has faced members of parliament for a direct interrogation.

An oceanfront subdivision known as Vacationland is the latest to be swallowed by lava flows as the Kilauea volcano continues to reshape the landscape on Hawaii's Big Island.

Meanwhile, a magnitude 5.6 earthquake struck near the volcano's summit.

The molten rock covered Vacationland, and only a few structures remained intact in nearby Kapoho Beach Lots subdivision, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

Chinese cellphone maker ZTE Corp. — the target of U.S. sanctions before President Trump ordered an abrupt about-face last month — has reportedly agreed to a preliminary deal to lift a U.S. Commerce Department ban on it buying from American suppliers.

A former Defense Intelligence Agency officer has been charged with attempted espionage for allegedly selling secrets to China.

Ron Rockwell Hansen, a 58-year-old Utah resident, was seized on Saturday on his way to the Seattle-Tacoma International Airport, where prosecutors say he meant to board a China-bound flight.

According to The Associated Press, a 41-page felony complaint details how Hansen was paid as much as $800,000 over a period of years to provide technology and secrets to Beijing.

The Justice Department is appealing a ruling made last month that President Trump cannot block followers to his Twitter account based on their political views, according to a court filing.

In the past, the president has blocked critics from his @realDonaldTrump account, ranging from novelist Stephen King, comedian Rosie O'Donnell and Philip Cohen, a professor of sociology at the University of Maryland and one of seven plaintiffs in the case.

Updated at 12:56 p.m. ET

A federal judge on Tuesday ordered a new hearing at which she is expected to consider accusations by prosecutors that former Donald Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort tampered with witnesses in his case.

Judge Amy Berman Jackson ordered Manafort, prosecutors, witnesses and others to be prepared to appear and to testify on June 15, according to the new order.

Prosecutors have asked Berman Jackson to rescind Manafort's bail and order him to jail ahead of his trial, which is scheduled for this autumn.

Updated 10:18 a.m. ET

President Trump has the "absolute" power to pardon himself, he argued on Monday morning, then asked rhetorically why he would use it because he hasn't done anything wrong.

Japan's Prime Minister Shinzo Abe says his government "cannot accept" new U.S. tariffs on imported automobiles, as is reportedly being considered as a possible next move by the White House.

President Trump last week launched an investigation into whether auto imports posed a national security risk to the U.S., a justification that might be used to raise the duty on cars from 2.5 percent up to 25 percent.

The board of the Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary has voted to fire its longtime president, Paige Patterson, who was ousted from the top post last week amid controversy over past counsel he had given women concerning marital abuse and rape.

The Fort Worth-based seminary's board voted a week ago to replace Patterson as president, appointing him instead "president emeritus with compensation."

Updated at 10 a.m. ET

Secretary of State Mike Pompeo is meeting with a top North Korean official for the second day on Thursday, resuming talks that began over dinner in New York as the two seek to salvage a June 12 summit between President Trump and Kim Jong Un.

The summit, planned since April, was called off just a week ago by Trump amid a renewed round of heated rhetoric from Pyongyang and concerns over whether North Korea was sincere about "denuclearization." Within days of canceling the summit, however, there was talk of getting it back on track.

No doubt, this was something famed illusionist David Copperfield hoped would go away. However, unlike one of his magic acts, he couldn't just make it disappear with the wave of a hand.

On Tuesday, a jury in Las Vegas found Copperfield negligent but not financially responsible for an injury suffered by British tourist Gavin Cox, who says he slipped and fell while acting as a "volunteer from the audience" during an illusion in Las Vegas in 2013.

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