MENTAL HEALTH

Purdue University Professor Doug Samuels led the study. (Photo courtesy of Purdue University)
Jill Sheridan

A patient’s self-evaluation of mental health problems may be more accurate than previously thought according to new research out of Purdue University. 

UIndy Launches Addiction Counseling Programs

Apr 5, 2018

The University of Indianapolis’ new addiction counseling programs are in response to a need in Indiana.

Currently, Indiana has too few behavioral health specialists to address mental health needs. And only 10 percent of this group focus specifically on addiction.

College of Applied Behavioral Sciences Dean Anita Thomas says most current behavioral health programs don’t offer enough training specializing in addiction.

(Pixabay)
Lauren Chapman

A crisis team intervention pilot program in Indianapolis has released initial findings.  

(Screenshot of LookUpIndiana.org)
Jill Sheridan

Nearly one-third of Hoosier students report feeling sad or hopeless, and school is the de facto mental health system for many of them.

A new partnership increases mental health resources for Indiana schools as one website adds tools to help school systems address the social and emotional needs of students.

Indiana House Republicans will push legislation this session that could eliminate nearly a third of all Indiana townships – potentially getting rid of more than 1,200 elected officials.

Legislative leaders pushed total township elimination about a decade ago – and were met with resounding, bipartisan opposition.

IN.gov

Today:    Lieutenant Governor Suzanne Crouch visited northwest Indiana recently for a speaking engagement before the Northwest Indiana Forum.  She also stopped by Lakeshore Public Radio and Sharon Jackson spoke with her about her comments on the Region.

We bring you that conversation, along with a "Lakeshore Focus" program with host Keith Kirkpatrick and his guest, Jake Messing, Director of Behavorial Health at St. Catherine's Hospital.  "Lakeshore Focus" airs on Lakeshore PBS on Fridays at 7:30 p.m.

Death Penalty Ban For People With Mental Illness

Oct 11, 2017

Indiana lawmakers Wednesday studied the potential of a move to prohibit the death penalty in cases where a defendant has a serious mental illness.

The majority of people who testified at a study committee hearing – including mental health advocates, public defenders, and the Catholic Church – favor a death penalty ban for people who diagnoses such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or traumatic brain injuries.

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AJ Casey / AJKC LLC

One day in August 2016, 83-year-old Albert Fink crashed his 2012 BMW sedan into a tree, on a curve on Indiana State Road 46 just outside of Bloomington.

A record number of stakeholders from around Indiana met to learn about the state’s progress and challenges in the field of mental health and addiction.

Indiana’s annual Mental Health Symposium began 20 years ago. Indiana University Institute of Psychiatric Research director John Nurnberger helped organize from the start. He says while there’s greater mental health awareness in Indiana – stigma is still a major barrier.

Indiana U.S. Senators Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) and Todd Young (R-Ind.) are pushing legislation to help get law enforcement better access to mental health services.

Lebanon, Indiana, police officer Taylor Nielsen says in the wake of a double-homicide she worked last year, she struggled with depression and thoughts of suicide.

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Cristian C / Flickr

The GOP's proposed health law, the American Health Care Act, has some mental health and addiction treatment advocates worried.

 

Suicide remains the second-leading cause of death for Hoosier teens and young adults in 2014 and 2015, according to a just released report.

Among a majority of states, Indiana ranks second for high schoolers who made a suicide plan and third for those who have seriously considered suicide.

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Regent Language Training / https://www.flickr.com/photos/regentlanguagetraining/

Since 2007, 19 states have adopted laws that mandate suicide awareness and prevention training for school educators. But Indiana health and education officials disagree on whether teachers should be the first line of defense.

Indiana requires new teachers to receive suicide prevention training, but a new bill would expand that requirement to all school employees who have ongoing contact with students.

There are too few geriatricians to treat senior Hoosiers, and national projections indicate, by 2030, there will be only one geriatric psychiatrist for every 27,000. With more responsibility falling to providers untrained in senior mental health, an Indiana University scientist has co-authored a guide.

Dr. Sophia Wang is a geriatric psychiatrist and scientist with the Indiana University Center for Health Innovation and Implementation Science. She says caregivers need to know the mental health risks for older adults.