NPR's Michel Martin speaks with reporter Shannon Liao about how some people in China are using video games to cope with fear and stay connected with friends during the coronavirus outbreak.

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Not My Job: Gloria Steinem

9 hours ago

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

And now the game where amazing people do completely mundane things. It's called Not My Job. Sixty years ago, Gloria Steinem helped found the feminist movement. She famously went undercover to work as a Playboy bunny to report what that was like. She founded Ms. Magazine. She's been a leading activist in the women's movement for decades. She has a new book out. She joins us now.

Gloria Steinem, welcome to WAIT WAIT... DON'T TELL ME.

GLORIA STEINEM: Thank you. Thank you.

(CHEERING)

Not My Job: Tim Kaine

9 hours ago

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

And now the game where notable people are asked questions about things they never bothered to notice because they were doing something important.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: Tim Kaine has represented Virginia in the U.S. Senate since 2013, and he was, prior to that, governor of the commonwealth. And you may remember he came pretty close to being vice president of the United States a couple years ago.

(CHEERING)

Not My Job: Nalini Nadkarni

9 hours ago

PETER SAGAL, HOST:

In the fall of last year, we reached a milestone - our 1,000th show. It's amazing we ever made it this far.

BILL KURTIS: It feels like it's just been 970 or so.

(LAUGHTER)

SAGAL: To mark the occasion, we went back to Salt Lake City, where we did our first-ever show in front of a live audience. And there, we talked to a remarkable woman, a professor of biology at the University of Utah.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

For all the words uttered about urgent, vital issues at this week's Democratic presidential debate, one was missing: Syria.

The war in Syria has gone on for 9 years.

At least half a million people have died. More than 5 million Syrians are now refugees. Almost another million have had to flee their homes in the Idlib region just since last December, as Bashar al-Assad's army, supported by Russian air strikes, has tried to bomb and shell the people of the province into an obliteration from their own country.

Let's Eat: Pita Stop

Feb 21, 2020

Join Chef Nick as he sits down with the brains and passion behind the Pita Stop located inside the South lake Mall on this special edition of Let's Eat!

Off Mic 2-21-2020

This week on "Art on the Air," we will have Tom Byelick of Tomfoolery Fun Club discussing an upcoming show at the Orak Shrine in Michigan City on Feb 29th.

Samantha Horton/IPB News

On this edition of the podcast the you’ll the latest on the closing of beloved amusement park Indiana Beach, Griffith leaders are hoping members of the Indiana House will be as receptive to their ongoing efforts to exit Calumet Township as state senators have been, Matt Rasnic reports on The Boy Scouts of America is seeking bankruptcy protection and Chris Nolte has a conversation with Ivy Tech President Sue Ellspermann. All of that, and more, on this edition of “Lakeshore Update”… 

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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MARY LOUISE KELLY, HOST:

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AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

Host Kevin Comerford of the Construction Adavancement Foundation talks about career opportunities in the Northwest Indiana Construction Trades and the training that plays a large roll in those careers.

Carl Lisek, host of "Green Fleet Radio," talks with Adam Thada, Director of Ecological Relationships, The Center at Donaldson.

Provided / Wild Things

John Cain, host of "Eye on the Arts," talks with Micah Bornstein about the upcoming Maurice Sendak Exhibit, taking place from February 14th through April 12th.

ZACH HERNDON / WTIU/WFIU News

On this edition of the podcast the you’ll the latest on U.S. Steel’s revised consent decree to ensure protections for Indiana Dunes National Park, the fetal remains found at an abortion doctors properties cannot be identified, Jeanie Lindsey reports on the hold off Gov. Eric Holcomb is taking on major statewide action on teacher pay raises until 2021and Chris Nolte has a conversation Tami Silverman, president and CEO of the Indiana Parenting Institute. All of that, and more, on this edition of “Lakeshore Update”…     

China reported 889 new cases of novel coronavirus infection on Friday, including more than 200 from a prison, and an additional 118 deaths – all but three in the province of Hubei, bringing the total deaths in the country to more than 2,200.

The latest count came as South Korea, with the highest number of cases outside China, reported another jump in infections to 204.

And residents clashed with police in a central Ukrainian town where evacuees from Wuhan, the Chinese province where the epidemic began, arrived for a two-week quarantine.

A few dozen volunteers are spending a Saturday morning in a hotel conference room in Macon, Ga., for a boot camp of sorts on fighting voter suppression.

"We are walking into a year that's going to be exciting, a little bit stressful," explains Hillary Holley, organizing director for Fair Fight Action. The group is waging a campaign against voter suppression in the 2020 election.

"We're gonna be working a lot, but we're ready for it," she says.

The Trump administration has revived the debate over "end-to-end encryption" — systems so secure that the tech companies themselves aren't able to read the messages, even when police present them with a warrant.

"It is hard to overstate how perilous this is," U.S. Attorney General William Barr said in a speech last fall. "By enabling dangerous criminals to cloak their communications and activities behind an essentially impenetrable digital shield, the deployment of warrant-proof encryption is already imposing huge costs on society."

The Democratic presidential primary is heading west for the third contest in the 2020 race. Nevada Democrats are hoping their caucuses avoid similar problems that plagued Iowa earlier this month.

Follow NPR's coverage for the latest updates, analysis and results as the caucuses get underway.

Florida is planning a major expansion of its highways with a series of toll roads that would open new parts of the state to development.

Exactly where the roads will go hasn't been announced yet, but opposition to the highways is growing in rural areas such as Jefferson County in North Florida. Mike Willis' family has lived there since before Florida became a state. He likes to refer to it as "the other Florida."

"Most people think of Florida as palm trees, white sandy beaches," he says. "We have rolling clay hills and beautiful pine forests."

Karen Keating's eighth-grade English students at Lower Dauphin Middle School in Hummelstown, Pa., fire up their laptops and gather a bundle of snowball microphones. With the click of a mouse, their laptops become studios, and they're ready to record.

Keating's class is writing, producing and editing podcasts that they'll submit to the NPR Student Podcast Challenge, and, like many teachers, Keating is using apps to help them make it happen.

Iran is holding national elections Friday, as voters choose members of parliament from a list of candidates winnowed down to feature hardliners and conservatives. Midterm elections are also being held for the Assembly of Experts, the clerics who have the power to select the country's supreme leader.

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