Court Speeds Up Decision On Endangered Bat Protections

Mar 4, 2021
Steve Taylor / University of Illinois

A court has ordered the federal government to decide whether the northern long-eared bat should be listed as an endangered species by the end of next year. Because of the deadly fungal disease, white-nose syndrome, the bat’s numbers have gotten dangerously low.

Justin Hicks / IPB News

Hoosiers 50 and older can now register for appointments to receive a COVID-19 vaccine. Wednesday's announcement from the Indiana Department of Health is the second expansion this week.

Northwest Indiana Times

Today:   "Times" business reporter Joseph Pete is on "Regionally Speaking" to talk about the stories he's put out in print and online, including one about Southlake Mall in Hobart and another on the growing number of "dollar stores" in the Region.   Meals On Wheels NWI volunteer director Charlie Misovye talks about the organization and how you can get involved as a volunteer. It serves residents in Lake and Porter Counties, with the most urgent needs these days in Hammond, Gary, Miller, Hobart, Lake Station, Merrillville, Portage, and Lowell.

The reason it's so hard to kill a mosquito is that they move really well.

Scientists are trying to build a robot with that kind of agility. And these tiny but mighty flying robots could be used in life-and-death situations, such as finding people in a collapsed building.

Kevin Chen says he spends "a lot of time looking at the flapping-wing physics, that is understanding how an insect can flap their wings and generate lift and drag forces."

Updated Thursday at 10:40 a.m. ET

House lawmakers on Wednesday passed the George Floyd Justice in Policing Act, a reform bill that would ban chokeholds and alter so-called qualified immunity for law enforcement, which would make it easier to pursue claims of police misconduct.

The 220-212 vote, mostly along party lines, came nine months after Floyd, a 46-year-old Black man, was killed by Minneapolis police officers last spring.

President Biden's new Education Secretary, Miguel Cardona, hit the ground running Wednesday. Just one day after being sworn in, Cardona traveled to his hometown of Meriden, Conn. with first lady Dr. Jill Biden, on a tour of schools meant to push for the return of in-person learning and to send a clear message to the American people — that the Biden Administration is doing all it can to get children back in classrooms.

Berta Romero, is a counselor at Mary Harris Mother Jones elementary school in Prince George's County, a suburb of Washington, D.C. It's a position that was created before the pandemic, to help undocumented children adjust to school.

As the speed of COVID vaccinations picks up, so do the reports of doses going to waste. And it's more than just a handful at the end of the day because of a few appointment cancellations. Health officials are trying to address the problems that lead to waste, but without slowing down the roll out of the lifesaving vaccinations.

A judge sentenced former NFL tight end Kellen Winslow II to 14 years in prison Wednesday for rapes and other sexual offenses against several women in Southern California.

San Diego County Superior Court Judge Blaine Bowman, who presided over Winslow's trial, called the former player "a sexual predator," according to news reports.

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Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Copyright 2021 NPR. To see more, visit https://www.npr.org.

Lakeshore Sports

Gary West Side was a pretty impressive boy's basketball team during the regular season.  Imagine how tough they will be now that they added a 6-9 talent off their injury list for the tournament.  We'll talk about the Cougars win in their first playoff game coming up and a fantastic outing by Bowman's Koron Davis against Andrean on today's sports.

The director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention voiced concern on Wednesday about the recent climb in the number of new cases of the coronavirus, warning that pandemic fatigue and the loosening of restrictions may be setting the stage for yet another surge this spring.

Credit Fieler Elementary School, Merrillville


MERRILLVILLE - First graders from Fieler Elementary School in Merrillville are having their own March Madness through reading.

The experience is courtesy of their teacher, Miss Talian.  She set up a bracket with 16 books, and each student gets to choose the winning book in each bracket.

A virtual bracket posted in their Google Classroom has a read aloud for each book linked to the document, so students can listen to stories before they cast their votes on Fridays.

How 2 Skiers Conquered Yosemite's Half Dome

Mar 3, 2021

At the end of last month, two skiers achieved an unprecedented feat: descending the summit of Yosemite National Park's iconic Half Dome into the valley below.

In 1865, a report declared that the rock formation — at more than 8,800 feet above sea level — was a path that "never will be trodden by human foot."

Since then, Half Dome has become a popular, but challenging, hike.

But on Feb. 21, Jason Torlano and Zach Milligan made the nearly 5,000-foot trek down on skis.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Dr. Rochelle Walensky has been head of the CDC for just over a month. And for most of that time, she was looking at hopeful signs - a sharp drop in new coronavirus cases, more people getting vaccinated and a third vaccine coming on the market. Now, it's starting to look like a mixed picture. New cases and deaths are creeping up. Texas and Mississippi are dropping statewide mask requirements and fully reopening for business.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Dr. Rochelle Walensky has been head of the CDC for just over a month. And for most of that time, she was looking at hopeful signs - a sharp drop in new coronavirus cases, more people getting vaccinated and a third vaccine coming on the market. Now, it's starting to look like a mixed picture. New cases and deaths are creeping up. Texas and Mississippi are dropping statewide mask requirements and fully reopening for business.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Dr. Rochelle Walensky has been head of the CDC for just over a month. And for most of that time, she was looking at hopeful signs - a sharp drop in new coronavirus cases, more people getting vaccinated and a third vaccine coming on the market. Now, it's starting to look like a mixed picture. New cases and deaths are creeping up. Texas and Mississippi are dropping statewide mask requirements and fully reopening for business.

Valpo Life website

Today:   Bill Hanna, the chief executive officer for the Dean and Barbara White Family Foundation, is on "Regionally Speaking" to talk about his role with the Foundation and its support of Lake and Porter County community projects and programs that promote health, wellness and offer economic development support.  Indiana University Northwest vice chancellor for university advancement and external affairs Jeri Pat Gabbert has an update on the just-completed I.U. Bicentennial campaign that's raised $10 million for the Gary campus.  She talks about the campaign's impact on the northwest Indiana community. And we bring back our conversation with Maya Energy LLC executive Jim Ventura about the solid waste and recyclables processing plant that will be built on Gary's west side.  Construction work on the site will begin soon.

Country music legend Dolly Parton got a taste of her own medicine on Tuesday when she received a dose of the COVID-19 vaccine whose research she helped fund.

Parton, 75, documented the moment in a video posted to social media in which she encouraged eligible viewers to get the shot and broke into a modified rendition of "Jolene" to that effect.

For Americans factories, business is good these days. Almost too good.

Unexpectedly strong demand for furniture, appliances and other manufactured goods is providing a windfall to many of the country's industries.

But as factory gears spin faster to meet the surging demand, a big headache is emerging: Supply chains are getting stretched more than ever, and critical components are proving a lot harder to procure.

Take the word of Drew Greenblatt, the president of Marlin Steel in Baltimore.

"The economy is snapping back in a big way," Greenblatt said.

Dr. Seuss Enterprises will cease publishing six of the author's books — including And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street and If I Ran the Zoo — saying they "portray people in ways that are hurtful and wrong." The books have been criticized for how they depict Asian and Black people.

President Biden said on Tuesday that a key milestone in the fight against COVID-19 could be reached two months faster than earlier projected. By the end of May, there should be enough vaccine doses for every adult in America, he said — a dramatic improvement to his initial timetable for late July.

A turning point in speeding up that pledge came a few weeks ago, on a Sunday afternoon in early February, during a phone call with Johnson & Johnson executives that had been planned for 15 minutes but stretched for longer than an hour, two senior administration officials told NPR.

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