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Good morning. I'm Rachel Martin.

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Michelle Butler of Eutaw, Ala., doesn't have to think too hard to know what she's grateful for this Thanksgiving. Many of her family members are getting to meet her son Curtis for the first time.

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A Georgia jury has convicted three white men of murdering Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man killed while jogging last year.

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How do protesters in Sudan respond to what they see as an incomplete return to civilian rule? The military ousted a civilian government, then restored the prime minister to power, under pressure. But the military did not step away from power itself.

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One of the retiring Democrats is Congresswoman Jackie Speier of California, who decided seven terms is enough. She spoke with A Martinez.

A MARTINEZ, BYLINE: So why retire now?

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And we are joined now by Ahmaud Arbery's father, Marcus Arbery, and family attorney Ben Crump.

Thank you both for being with us today.

BEN CRUMP: Thank you for having us.

MARCUS ARBERY: Yes.

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There is a scene in Sandra Bullock's new film, which, if you walked in midway, you could momentarily mistake for one of her earlier rom-coms, a guy takes her to lunch at a diner and tries to impress her.

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Before going on Thanksgiving holiday, President Biden announced he will release 50 million barrels of oil from strategic reserves to address a big concern on Americans' minds.

(SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING)

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Tensions are high right now between the U.S. and China, but President Biden does not have an ambassador in Beijing because a key Republican senator is stalling his pick. NPR White House correspondent Franco Ordoñez has more.

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Every year, Monarch butterflies from all over the Western U.S. migrate to coastal California to escape harsh winter weather. In the 1980s and '90s, more than a million made the trip. Lately, those numbers have fallen.

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Some religious leaders are condemning Indiana Attorney General Todd Rokita's latest published remarks discussing Black Lives Matter in schools and issues like critical race theory. They say it's fanning the flames of division, and ignoring longstanding problems for underserved students instead of empowering families. 

Every year, more outlets offer holiday movies (and by that I mean overwhelmingly Christmas movies, but occasionally not). And the places that offer them seem to offer more. It has become a kudzu situation. How are we getting VH1 holiday movies now? How did Food Network get involved?

Nonetheless, here we are for the third year in a row to look at this year's crop, complete with trope elements in bold. A few notes:

Updated November 24, 2021 at 3:23 PM ET

The three white men who chased down and killed Ahmaud Arbery, a 25-year-old Black man who was jogging through their Georgia neighborhood last year, were all found guilty of murder charges.

The high-profile shooting — and the 10 weeks it took for law enforcement to make the first arrests — galvanized racial injustice protests in the summer of 2020.

Republican lawmakers are backing off their plan to return to the Statehouse next week to pass a bill that effectively bars employers from enforcing COVID-19 vaccine mandates.

Indiana schools are seeing a surge in the number of students taking career and technical education courses this school year. Nearly 225,000 students enrolled in hands-on skills classes, far more than at any point in the last five years.

The Governor’s Workforce Cabinet reports 30,000 more students are taking CTE classes than last year. However, the 2020-21 school year had a slump in enrollments in hands-on courses as social distancing required instructors to modify or pause certain parts of their curriculums. 

Schools have played a vital role in connecting Hoosier children with access to food and meal services during the pandemic, through local meal services and the records they keep.

Indiana Democrats hope the state party’s support of marijuana legalization can become a political victory for them. But political scientists say achieving that will likely take considerable time and effort.

Wetlands are good at trapping a lot of carbon dioxide in a small space. Now that the state is protecting fewer wetlands, it's possible more CO2 will get released into the air as they’re destroyed.

The skyrocketing cost and limited supply of fertilizer, combined with increases in other input costs continues to concern farmers according to the latest Purdue Ag Economy Barometer.

The Shoppers Weekly Illinois website

Today:  Diana Bosse, the city of Crown Point's entertainment superintendent, is on "Regionally Speaking" to talk about the 2021 "Adopt-A-Family" program, which will assist 12 local families and about 30 children during the holiday season.  Indiana Youth Institute's Tami Silverman was on the program recently to talk about ways to help children learn about the importance of kindness and giving.  We bring back that conversation, along with one with Paige Sharp with the Indiana Arts Commission about an annual program that helps Hoosier artists become better entrepreneurs.  South Shore Arts is a local partner in the program.  Side Effects Public Media reporter Carter Barrett also has a report on conservatorships -- with an example of a Hoosier who was under one for years, controlled by his parents, even though he was an adult with a wife and a child.

The Indiana Immunization Coalition says it saw an increase in employers asking for COVID-19 vaccination clinics at job sites earlier this month. It was a response to a workplace vaccination push from the federal government, now put on pause by courts.

Lisa Robertson, executive director of the immunization coalition, says the group started in 2003 to simply educate and promote routine vaccinations for school children. But when COVID-19 came, they got involved in administering vaccine clinics at schools and job sites around the state.

Updated November 23, 2021 at 6:37 PM ET

A child who was injured Sunday when an SUV plowed through a crowd at a Christmas parade in Waukesha, Wis., has died, bringing the death toll from the attack to six.

Prosecutors in Wisconsin made the announcement on Tuesday as they outlined charges against the suspect in the attack, Darrell Brooks Jr.

To celebrate the 30th anniversary of World Cafe, we're looking back and posting playlists from each year of the show. As music has evolved over the years, so have our playlists, which have grown to reflect a much wider range of music than when we first set out.

It turned out to be one of the best years for music of the entire decade, with releases that remain indelible and influential. Let's rewind 25 years, to 1996.

Federal health officials are urging Americans to shore up their immunity ahead of the winter holidays by getting a COVID-19 booster shot. But not everyone is working with the same defenses when it comes to keeping the virus at bay.

More than 47 million people in the U.S have already caught the coronavirus, at least according to officially recorded numbers. In reality, it's probably many millions more.

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