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The dawn of the nuclear age began with a blinding, flesh-melting blast directly above the Japanese city of Hiroshima on Aug. 6, 1945. It was 8:16 a.m. on a Monday, the start of another workday in a city of nearly 300,000 inhabitants. An estimated two-thirds of that population — nearly all civilians — would soon be dead.

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All right. Time now for an espresso shot of musical endorphins.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

GREENE: When the pandemic forced summer music festivals to cancel, banjo players felt particularly unstrung.

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Boys and Girls Clubs of Greater Northwest Indiana

SOUTH HAVEN - The Boys & Girls Clubs of Greater Northwest Indiana has just received one of it's biggest and most valuable donations it has ever gotten thus-far.

It has been given nearly two acres of land that is adjacent to the South Haven Boys & Girls Club on what is now the north end of the Club’s property.  The donation came from Indiana American Water.  According to a news release from the Boys & Girls Clubs, the lot is valued at more than $130,000.

The National Hockey League resumed play on Saturday, with players emerging from the "bubbles" they've been hunkering down in since July 26.

And so far, players are staying healthy. Since relocating to the bubbles — in two Canadian cities, Edmonton and Toronto — the league says it's given more than 7,000 tests to players on 24 teams, and none have come back positive for COVID-19.

The key to keeping the league safe, says NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman, has been to "be as flexible as possible."

In June, the Trump administration introduced Operation Warp Speed, an initiative to deliver 300 million doses of an effective COVID-19 vaccine by January 2021.

On Fox & Friends Wednesday morning, President Trump said the effort to accelerate the development, manufacturing and distribution of a vaccine for COVID-19 is making good progress.

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It is early days, but so far, so good for the NHL in the pandemic. Hockey players returned to the ice on Saturday. Twenty-four teams are hunkering down in two separate bubbles - one in Edmonton and the other in Toronto. And after more than 7,000 COVID tests given, the league says there have been no positive cases. Earlier, I talked to NHL Commissioner Gary Bettman about the state of play, and he first took us back to the start of hockey's shutdown.

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The legendary newspaper columnist Pete Hamill has died. He was 85. He was a New York City tabloid crusader, and that made him one of the most influential figures in the city for decades. In 2011, Pete Hamill spoke with WHYY's Fresh Air.

Regional music group, REGGAE EXPRESS, will be bringing the summer sounds of the islands to my radio studio tomorrow while guesting on "Midwest BEAT with Tom Lounges"

All IN: Creating Art In Uncertain Times

Aug 5, 2020
Provided by Kyle Ragsdale

Artists take inspiration from many places, but the societal upheaval of the pandemic, and protests for racial justice are ringing loudly right now. How are Indiana’s artists responding? What effect is the pandemic having on their income, and their ability to complete their work?

Free Thought Fort Wayne/YouTube

Today: Andy Downs, the director of the Mike Downs Center for Indiana Politics at Purdue University Ft Wayne is with us to review the state of Hoosier politics during the pandemic, with the statewide candidates seeking votes and finances after the late primary election going into the November general election.  Andy also talks about the issue of "vote-by-mail" -- the push for it that was prompted by COVID-19  and whether it will return in November.  Lake Central School Corp. superintendent Dr. Larry Veracco also joins us to talk about the decision, by his board, for parents to have the choice of in-person or virtual learning for their youngsters as the fall semester begins.  He talks abut how future reviews of, among other factors, local  COVID positivity will play a role in keeping things as they are.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Indianapolis-based Eli Lilly is moving to Phase 3 testing of a treatment to prevent COVID-19 after initial success. The next step will be to test the drug at nursing homes where the pandemic has hit hard.

Carl Lisek, host of "Green Fleet Radio," talks with Shawn Seals, Senior Environmental Manager for the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.  "Green Fleet Radio" is made possible by South Shore Clean Cities & the Northwestern Indiana Regional Planning Commission.

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Lakeshore Sports

The Oilmen dropped out of first place in Midwest Collegiate League baseball action yesterday.  But if you think they had a bad day, imagine being a prep football player in the Hammond school district.  We will discuss both bad news scenario's on today's sports.

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In early April, the coronavirus was killing more than 700 New Yorkers every day. New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced those spiking death tolls but added a note of hope - shutdown and social distancing were working.

Scientists from Canada's Royal Ontario Museum and McMaster University say they have identified malignant bone cancer in a dinosaur for the first time.

The new research was published earlier this week in the journal The Lancet Oncology.

The diagnosis? Osteosarcoma — an aggressive bone cancer — in the fibula, or lower leg bone, of a Centrosaurus apertus, a plant-eating, single-horned dinosaur that lived 76 to 77 million years ago.

FILE PHOTO: Doug Jaggers / WFYI News

The Indy 500 will run without people in the stands this year. The Indianapolis Motor Speedway announced the decision Tuesday, reversing previous plans to maintain some attendance during the coronavirus pandemic.

Brandon Smith / IPB News

Indiana says it has spent – or committed to spending – less than $1 billion in federal CARES Act money out of the $2.4 billion it’s received.

You Asked: How Contact Tracing Works

Aug 4, 2020
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Experts say contact tracing is key to understanding and managing the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, and many community members have questions about the process. Side Effects received dozens of those questions through our partnership with Indiana Public Broadcasting. 

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Today we talk about the different approaches Indiana schools are taking to reopen, and the guidance they're using to make those decisions.

Indianapolis Motor Speedway

Today:  Indianapolis Motor Speedway historian Donald Davidson joins us to talk about the delays and cancellations of the Indianapolis 500 Mile Race in years past --some due to wars, others due to weather.  This year's running of the "Greatest Spectacle in Racing," the 104th running, will be on August 23rd but it will be run without spectators.  We have another conversation from the Welcome Project at Valparaiso University today, and Sandra Noe and Rachel Hurst with Meals on Wheels in Northwest Indiana will talk about the organization's mission throughout the coronavirus pandemic to continue providing meals to people who need them the most, as well as making sure that those meal recipients are safe.

It’s Tuesday, August 4th, 2020… Stay tuned for the latest on schools across Northwest Indiana moving to e-learning or delaying in-person starts this fall, and the Indianapolis 500's plans for spectators this month.

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RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

All right. So that's the situation in that particular county in North Carolina. We're going to turn now to NPR's Sarah McCammon, who is in Virginia Beach, watching all this unfold and tracking the storm. Hi, Sarah.

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