Audie Cornish

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We're going to take you back 20 years now, just weeks after 9/11. The U.S. is on edge. The FBI is one of many government agencies tracking down leads connected to the attacks.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "THE HOT ZONE: ANTHRAX")

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Mariano Alvarado is a modern-day storm chaser of sorts, but it's not a hobby. It pays his bills. Alvarado was a fisherman in Honduras. Then droughts tied to climate change hit his industry.

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New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio is declaring victory as his administration begins to enforce a COVID-19 vaccine mandate for all city workers. As of today, 91% of the city's workforce has had at least one shot.

Updated November 2, 2021 at 12:41 PM ET

The rapper Fetty Wap was arrested last week at Rolling Loud New York, on drug charges. But he's not the first rapper to be detained ahead of the annual hip-hop festival, or barred from performing by local authorities. There exists, says journalist Jayson Buford, a continued pattern of law enforcement "essentially using rap lyrics to try to prove that rappers are violent people in real life."

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Earlier this year, an upstart won a Grammy in the category of Roots Gospel.

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UNIDENTIFIED PERSON: And the Grammy goes to "Celebrating Fisk!"

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Janet Jackson opened her album "Control" not with a song, but with a statement.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "CONTROL")

JANET JACKSON: This is a story about control, my control.

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After what we've all been through the last 18 months, we desperately need a laugh. But there hasn't been much to laugh about. Josh Johnson was one of the few brave comics who tried to hold up a funhouse mirror to the pandemic.

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Next, we're going to tell you the story of a dream almost deferred. It begins with a little girl raised in the segregated South of the '30s and '40s.

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The WNBA playoffs are kicking off with a pair of first-round single elimination games. And one of the teams playing - the New York Liberty, the team that clinched a place in the playoffs by a technicality. Their last game was Friday.

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And for my next guest, I needed to know one thing before we got started. So am I talking to a film nerd, buff, scholar? How do you relate to films?

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You know, this is the third school year that's been disrupted because of coronavirus, and so many of the challenges that made spring 2020, fall 2020 and spring 2021 so tough...

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For more reaction to the day's events, we're going to bring in Democratic Congressman Jason Crow from Colorado. He's also an Army Ranger who served in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Welcome back to the program.

JASON CROW: Hi, Audie.

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Bob Ross — the artist known for his calm voice, poofy hair and unflappable demeanor — spent 31 seasons gently encouraging at-home artists to pick up their palettes to paint serene landscapes and "happy little trees."

Actor Melissa McCarthy and her husband, filmmaker Ben Falcone, were big fans of Ross and decided to produce a documentary about his life. But as they began working on the project with filmmakers Joshua Rofé and Steven Berger, they quickly realized their subject — and the legacy he left behind — was more complex than they knew.

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