Brett Neely

Brett Neely is an editor with NPR's Washington Desk, where he edits coverage of elections, campaign finance, government ethics, and voting rights. He also works closely with member station reporters to coordinate political coverage.

Neely came to NPR in 2015 and worked closely with a team of member station reporters throughout the 2016 election cycle as part of NPR's ongoing initiative to deepen its editorial ties with stations. After the 2016 election, he worked with member station colleagues to deepen coverage of state government and politics for local and national audiences.

Before coming to NPR, Neely was a reporter for Minnesota Public Radio News, based in Washington, where he covered Congress and the federal government for one of public radio's largest newsrooms. Between 2007 and 2009, he was based in Berlin where he worked as a freelance reporter for multiple outlets. He got his start in journalism as a producer for the public radio show Marketplace.

Neely graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Occidental College in Los Angeles with a bachelor's degree in international relations. He also received a master's degree in international relations from the University of Chicago. He is a fluent German speaker.

Updated at 9:44 a.m. ET

The House Judiciary Committee has scheduled a vote for Wednesday to authorize subpoenas for the full version of special counsel Robert Mueller's report, the committee announced Monday.

Updated at 4:56 p.m. ET

Minnesota Democratic Sen. Amy Klobuchar announced she's running for president on Sunday afternoon, joining a crowded and historically diverse field of candidates seeking to defeat President Trump.

She is the fifth Democratic senator to launch a White House bid, with others still contemplating joining a primary field that has grown to 11 candidates.

Updated at 3:29 p.m. ET

President Trump admitted Thursday to reimbursing his lawyer for a $130,000 payment made on the eve of the 2016 election to porn actress Stormy Daniels as part of a settlement about her alleged 2006 sexual encounter with Trump.

Trump, however, denied any sexual encounter and claims the payment was in no way connected with the campaign — despite the timing.

Updated at 8:30 p.m. ET

Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg will testify on Capitol Hill on April 10 and 11 before the a joint hearing of the Senate Judiciary and Commerce Committees, followed by one before the House Energy and Commerce Committee, to answer questions about how the company protects its users' data.

Updated at 9:00 a.m.

Reaction to President Trump's first State of the Union speech followed the familiar choose-your-own-partisan-narrative script that's dominated political life since the 2016 election.

Republican members of Congress frequently offered safe, predictable praise particularly around economic policy. Said Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.: "We're coming out of this economic funk that we were in throughout the Obama years and the president was right to talk about it and to take some credit for the direction America is heading in."

Updated at 1:15 a.m. ET Thursday

An Amtrak train carrying House and Senate Republicans to their annual retreat in West Virginia struck a garbage truck Wednesday morning near Charlottesville, Va.

At least one person was killed, according to a statement released by White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders.