Camila Domonoske

Boeing's bestselling jetliner, the 737 Max, has crashed twice in six months — the Lion Air disaster in October and the Ethiopian Airlines crash this month. Nearly 350 people have been killed, and the model of plane has been grounded indefinitely as investigations are underway.

Boeing has maintained the planes are safe. But trust — from the public, from airlines, from pilots and regulators — has been shaken.

So far, experts say, Boeing has mishandled this crisis but has the opportunity to win back confidence in the future.

With its fastest-selling plane grounded in the U.S. and around the world, Boeing faces potential hits to its bottom line as well as to its reputation. A lengthy delay could cut Boeing's revenues by billions, some analysts say.

For nearly two weeks in September, developers who created apps for Facebook were able to access user photos that they should never have been allowed to see, the social media company announced Friday.

Up to 6.8 million users may have been affected, Facebook says.

The "bug" affects users who gave permission to a third-party app to access their Facebook photos. Normally, that would only include photos that someone actually posted to their timeline.

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET

After week-long peace talks at a castle in Sweden, the Yemeni government and Houthi rebels have agreed to a cease-fire in Hodeidah, a strategically significant port city held by the rebels.

The ability to import food, medicine and fuel through the port is essential for many Yemenis, and a Saudi blockade of Hodeidah helped drive widespread hunger in the country.

Updated at 2:15 p.m. ET

The situation at the San Ysidro Land Port of Entry has been chaotic and confusing in recent days. And reactions from the American public suggest that photos and footage from the scene serve as a sort of Rorschach test.

Voter turnout on Tuesday was massive: More than 47 percent of the voting-eligible population cast a ballot in the midterm elections on Tuesday, according to early estimates from the United States Election Project.

"Almost half of possible voters actually voted" might not sound impressive. But for a U.S. midterm election, it's a whopping figure. Compare that with just 36.7 percent in 2014, and 41 percent in 2010.

That's the highest turnout for a midterm since 1966, when 49 percent of the population showed up to vote.

Updated at 5:25 p.m. ET

America's 116th Congress is going to include some prominent firsts — and several governors' races also made history in these midterms.

The U.S. has ushered in its first Native American and Muslim congresswomen, its first lesbian mom in Congress and the first openly gay man elected as a governor. South Dakota and Maine elected their first female governors, Tennessee and Arizona sent their first women to the Senate, and Massachusetts and Connecticut elected their first black women to the House.

The hotel chain Motel 6 has agreed to pay $7.6 million to settle a class-action lawsuit after multiple Motel 6 locations gave guest lists to Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents.

Sharing those lists led to arrests and deportations of an as-yet-unknown number of hotel guests.

The settlement deal was tentatively reached in July, but details were not public until this week. The agreement, which still needs to be approved by a federal judge, calls for Motel 6 to pay money directly to affected guests and also to impose tighter controls over private information.

The Department of Justice has once again petitioned the Supreme Court to intervene in pending cases over the future of DACA, or Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the Obama-era program that protects immigrants who were brought to the U.S. illegally as children.

The program is keeping about 700,000 young people from being deported, NPR's Joel Rose notes. At the moment, DACA is accepting renewals but not new applicants. If the program is ended, currently protected individuals could be deported, though it's not clear how quickly that might happen.

Nawaz Sharif, the former prime minister of Pakistan, has been released from prison on bail as he challenges his conviction and 10-year prison sentence.

Sharif, who served three nonconsecutive terms as prime minister, was in London during his trial earlier this year. He was found guilty of corruption in absentia and returned to Pakistan to appeal his conviction two months ago — and was promptly arrested and imprisoned.

Reality Winner, the former National Security Agency contractor who pleaded guilty to leaking classified intelligence to a media outlet, has been sentenced to more than five years in prison.

On Thursday, a federal judge in Georgia approved a plea deal that called for five years and three months in prison along with three years of supervision after release.

Winner, 26, also will have to complete 100 hours of community service once she is released.

Updated at 8:30 a.m. ET Thursday

Hungary's government has stopped providing food to adult asylum-seekers who have been denied but have appealed their cases, prompting outcry from human rights groups and intervention from the European Court of Human Rights.

Updated at 9 a.m. ET Wednesday

U.S. officials say a 95-year-old former Nazi labor camp guard named Jakiw Palij who lied about his wartime work when he immigrated to the United States has been deported to Germany.

Palij, who lived in Queens in New York City, was investigated and denaturalized more than a decade ago. His deportation was ordered in 2004. But for years, no country would take him in.

On Monday, he was sent to Germany, according to the State Department. The Department of Justice says Palij is the 68th Nazi removed from the U.S.

A federal judge has sentenced Esteban Santiago to life in prison for carrying out a 2017 shooting in a Fort Lauderdale, Fla., airport that killed five people and injured six others.

U.S. District Judge Beth Bloom called Santiago's attack "85 seconds of evil" when she announced the sentence Friday.

Santiago had accepted a plea bargain, admitting guilt on 11 charges in exchange for prosecutors declining to seek the death penalty.

Movie theater subscription service MoviePass will not be raising prices, as it had announced last week, but will instead be capping the number of times that subscribers can visit movie theaters.

For $9.95 per month, MoviePass subscribers used to be able to see a movie in theaters every day, if they so chose. Beginning on August 15, the service will instead provide three movies per month.

Updated at 9:01 p.m. ET Wednesday

A federal judge in California has ruled that a confidential messaging app must release the identity of a user who is accused of helping plan violence at a white nationalist rally last year in Charlottesville, Va.

Updated at 1:45 p.m. ET

China has announced a plan to impose new tariffs on $60 billion of American goods, in retaliation for the latest tariff threats from the Trump administration.

Earlier this week, the White House said it was considering boosting tariffs on $200 billion worth of Chinese goods, raising those tariffs to 25 percent from 10 percent. That particular set of tariffs has not yet taken effect.

A drone flight and a lingering dry spell have exposed a previously unknown monument in Ireland's Boyne Valley, forgotten for thousands of years and long covered by crops — which, struggling to cope with a lengthy drought, finally revealed the ancient footprint.

Kandace Vallejo thought she knew Southwest Key Programs: a big nonprofit based in Austin, Texas. Runs a charter school. Works with youth.

And holds thousands of migrant children in facilities paid for by the U.S. government.

That was news.

Updated at 4:40 a.m. ET Wednesday

Since early May, 2,342 children have been separated from their parents after crossing the Southern U.S. border, according to the Department of Homeland Security, as part of a new immigration strategy by the Trump administration that has prompted widespread outcry.

On Wednesday, President Trump signed an executive order reversing his policy of separating families — and replacing it with a policy of detaining entire families together, including children, but ignoring legal time limits on the detention of minors.

Updated at 5:15 p.m. ET

With chants of "families united" and "free our children now," hundreds of people marched to the tent city in Tornillo, Texas, where children have been detained for immigration violations.

The Father's Day march near El Paso was primarily organized by Democratic Rep. Beto O'Rourke of Texas, who is also running for Senate against Ted Cruz. He says the march was the brainchild of Veronica Escobar, who is running to fill his seat in the House, as well as other community leaders.

A massive dust storm on Mars is threatening NASA's Opportunity rover, which has been conducting research on the Red Planet for well over a decade.

Where the rover sits, the dust storm has completely blotted out the sun, depriving Opportunity of solar power and cutting off communications with Earth.

NASA scientists believe the rover has fallen asleep to wait out the storm, and that when the dust storm dies down and sunlight returns, the rover will resume activity.

A proposal to divide California into three separate states will appear on the ballot in November, after an idiosyncratic, years-long quest by a venture capitalist.

The migrant rescue ship Aquarius, which was left stranded in the Mediterranean Sea after Italy and Malta closed their ports to it, is heading off on a three-day journey to Spain — with help from the same countries that turned it away.

After the ship rescued migrants off the coast of Libya over the weekend, Italy said it wanted the rest of Europe to take the passengers; Malta said this ship was clearly Italy's responsibility.

Dorothy Cotton, a leader in the civil rights movement who educated thousands of African-Americans about their rights and the power of organizing, has died at 88.

She died at a retirement community in Ithaca, N.Y., the Ithaca Journal reports. The Southern Christian Leadership Conference confirmed her death to the Associated Press.

The Supreme Court in the United Kingdom has rejected an attempt to overturn Northern Ireland's strict abortion limits — but a majority of the justices also say the current law is "deeply unsatisfactory" and violates human rights.

Northern Ireland — unlike every other part of the U.K. — criminalizes abortion except when a woman's life or health is in danger. There is no exception for rape or incest, or for situations in which a fetus is not expected to live.

Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission had challenged the law in court.

Updated at 3 a.m. ET

The California judge who prompted a national outcry after handing former Stanford University swimmer Brock Turner a six-month sentence for sexual assault has been recalled by voters in Santa Clara County.

With 43 percent of county precincts reporting, 59 percent of voters favored the recall of Superior Court Judge Aaron Persky, 41 percent opposed the recall, according to The Associated Press, who called the vote early Wednesday.

Originally, it was just a name — Olga Monsanto's name, to be precise.

Around the turn of the 20th century, she married a man named John Francis Queeny. He named his artificial sweetener company after her. And over decades, that company expanded from the sweetness business into agri-chemicals, where it began to dominate the industry.

Updated 3:03 p.m. ET

President Trump has pardoned conservative commentator Dinesh D'Souza, who pleaded guilty in 2014 to making illegal campaign contributions in other people's names.

On Twitter on Thursday, Trump said D'Souza was "treated very unfairly by our government."

Updated at 3:26 p.m. ET

Prosecutors have dropped one felony charge against Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens, who will be will be resigning on Friday amid scandals about alleged misbehavior on the campaign trail and in the bedroom.

The governor's resignation was the result of a deal with prosecutors, who agreed to drop the charge if Greitens stepped down, St. Louis Public Radio reports.

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