Jackie Northam

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Updated September 9, 2021 at 2:50 PM ET

A flight with about 200 people, including some Americans, has landed in Doha, Qatar, after departing Kabul's airport earlier Thursday, a U.S. official says. It was the first international flight to leave Afghanistan since the U.S. withdrew its forces at the end of August.

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Three weeks after taking over Afghanistan's capital city, Kabul, this morning, the Taliban have finally announced an interim government. NPR's Jackie Northam is covering it and joins us now. Jackie, thanks for being here.

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So that's what a Taliban spokesman says they will do. And we'll be reporting in the weeks and months ahead on what they do. And we start right now with NPR international affairs correspondent Jackie Northam. Jackie, good morning.

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A new film tells the story of an American student studying abroad in France. She ends up in prison, accused of murdering her roommate. And her father, played by Matt Damon, goes on a pursuit to prove her innocence. If the story sounds familiar, it's because, as Vanity Fair put it, the director, Tom McCarthy, was, quote, "directly inspired by the Amanda Knox saga," a phrase Knox says inaccurately frames the truth about what happened.

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It would be tempting to hope the recent stranding of the 1,300-foot, 220,000-ton Ever Given container ship in the Suez Canal was a one-off — just a case of a very big ship getting stuck in a narrow waterway.

But more than 100 ships of similar size are plying the world's waterways, and even bigger ones are being built in Asia, creating logistical challenges and concerns about more mishaps in the future.

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Updated March 29, 2021 at 11:09 AM ET

Before the grounding of the massive Ever Given container ship in the Suez Canal, some 50 vessels a day, or about 10% of global trade, sailed through the waterway each day — everything from consumer electronics to food, chemicals, ore and petroleum.

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A fleet of oil tankers from Saudi Arabia has begun arriving on the U.S. Gulf Coast. But this country already has plenty of crude oil. So why is there more coming in from Saudi Arabia? NPR's Jackie Northam explains.

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