Uri Berliner

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Now let's dig into some new research about something many of us are guilty of - using buzzwords and corporate gobbledygook. NPR's Uri Berliner has a look at why it just won't go away.

URI BERLINER, BYLINE: You've heard these phrases before, maybe more than you ever wanted to.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: There's definitely some synergy here.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: That is a win.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #3: That's a win-win.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: Let's get our ducks in a row here, guys.

There's a saying going around these days: The future of work is now — put into overdrive by the pandemic that suddenly transformed millions into virtual workers. But the coronavirus has also accelerated a major shift to freelancing that's severing ties between companies and employees.

Two million Americans have started freelancing in the past 12 months, according to a new study from Upwork, a freelance job platform. And that has increased the proportion of the workforce that performs freelance work to 36%.

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The United States is heading into a very sharp downturn in the next three months. That much seems certain.

What is unique this time is that we as a country are willing it to happen.

Collectively — intentionally — we are putting much of the economy on lockdown. The priorities are clear: save lives and keep hospitals and emergency rooms from being overwhelmed. For now, that means America is an economic ghost town.

The stunning, rapid plunge in stock prices over the spreading coronavirus pandemic has understandably captured headlines for days.

But there's a parallel story that has received much less attention: the health of the underlying financial plumbing that allows banks and markets to operate smoothly.

That system, according to analysts, is now under strain.

Doing business in China comes with major strings attached. This week it became evident that a few provocative words can cause those strings to tighten.

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Next, we're going to hear a story of a very different business that you might not associate with tariffs - Bassetts Ice cream.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #1: Thank you, sir.

UNIDENTIFIED PERSON #2: Thank you.

Tesla To Stay Public

Aug 25, 2018

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President Trump is cutting deals with the European Union this afternoon. In a joint appearance in the Rose Garden, President Trump and European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker announced some agreements on trade.

Russia and Saudi Arabia have been longtime adversaries over geopolitics and military operations in the Middle East. Now, they've formed a surprising bond that is reshaping global oil markets.

As two of the world's largest oil producers, they have engineered significant production cuts to mop up an oil glut that had been keeping energy prices low for years. The unexpected alliance is one of the reasons motorists in the U.S. have seen prices at the pump climb 18 percent over the past year.

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Since the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Florida two weeks ago, a number of companies have taken a position in the debate over guns. Many severed ties with the National Rifle Association.

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A new NPR/Marist poll finds that 1 in 5 jobs in America is held by a worker under contract. Within a decade, contractors and freelancers could make up half of the American workforce. In a weeklong series, NPR explores many aspects of this change.

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