All Things Considered

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NPR's evening news magazine. All Things Considered is serious news, frivolous fun and everything in between.

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There's a lot at stake for Palestinians, whether President Trump or former Vice President Joe Biden wins the election. NPR's Daniel Estrin reports there's no question who most Palestinians want to see win.

Ambassador John Bolton, who worked as national security adviser to President Trump from 2018 to 2019, told NPR's All Things Considered that he does not believe the United States is safer today than it was four years ago.

"I think unfortunately it's not safer, which is not to say that there haven't been some important positive decisions made and some important accomplishments," he said, including withdrawing from the 2015 Iran nuclear deal and from a Cold War-era nuclear arms control treaty with Russia.

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Are we better off than we were four years ago? That is the question we normally ask ourselves when a president seeks reelection, so we've been asking people with deep expertise in different subjects and different perspectives to answer this question. And we're going to begin today's program by putting it to Ambassador John Bolton.

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Are we better off than we were four years ago? That is the question we normally ask ourselves when a president seeks reelection, so we've been asking people with deep expertise in different subjects and different perspectives to answer this question. And we're going to begin today's program by putting it to Ambassador John Bolton.

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Layoffs, food stamps, hurricane - this is not what Jennifer Stalley had planned for 2020.

JENNIFER STALLEY: I'll be fine. It's fine. Everything's fine. And then, it's - nothing's fine (laughter).

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The bestselling author Rebecca Roanhorse grew up reading science fiction and fantasy novels that didn't often reflect her own experience and history as a Native American woman.

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The coronavirus is now spreading through more than a dozen states, including Wisconsin. On Wednesday alone, there were more than 3,000 new infections and more than two dozen deaths. The state is averaging 2,840 new cases per day, an increase of 22% from the average two weeks earlier.

In total, 158,578 people in Wisconsin have tested positive for the virus and 1,536 people have died.

Last week, craving sweets, Colin Purrington remembered the Twinkies.

He'd purchased them back in 2012 for sentimental reasons when he heard that Hostess Brands was going bankrupt and Twinkies might disappear forever.

"When there's no desserts in the house, you get desperate," says Purrington, who went down to the basement and retrieved the old box of snack cakes, fully intending to enjoy several.

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Yemen is often described as the world's worst humanitarian crisis. A Saudi-led coalition there has been fighting Iranian-backed rebels for over five years. But today there was a glimmer of hope, as NPR's Michele Kelemen reports.

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Coronavirus cases are spiking again in the U.S., especially in the upper Midwest. Wisconsin reported more than 3,000 new infections and more than two dozen deaths yesterday alone. The state's hospitals are overwhelmed with more than a thousand COVID-19 patients. So Wisconsin has opened a pop-up hospital at the state's fairgrounds outside Milwaukee. At the same time, there are court battles over the governor's emergency rules to contain the virus.

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Researchers appear to have shown how the brain creates two different kinds of thirst.

The process involves two types of brain cells, one that responds to a decline in fluid in our bodies, while the other monitors levels of salt and other minerals, a team reports in the journal Nature.

Together, these specialized thirst cells seem to determine whether animals and people crave pure water or something like a sports drink, which contains salt and other minerals.

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An investigation by Oregon Public Broadcasting and ProPublica shows widely differing accounts of the killing of Antifa supporter Michael Forest Reinoehl. At the beginning of September, a federal fugitive task force led by the U.S. Marshals shot and killed Reinoehl near Olympia, Wash. Reinoehl was suspected in the killing of a far-right activist in Portland, Ore., just days earlier. Joining us now is OPB's Conrad Wilson.

Welcome.

CONRAD WILSON, BYLINE: Hi, Ailsa.

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Updated at 10:40 p.m. ET

The Trump administration can end counting for the 2020 census early after the Supreme Court approved a request to suspend a lower court order that extended the count's schedule.

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We have some breaking news now about the 2020 U.S. census from the Supreme Court. This afternoon, the high court granted the Trump administration's request to end counting as soon as possible. This comes after an emergency request from the administration. NPR's Hansi Lo Wang covers the census for us and joins us now.

Hi, Hansi.

HANSI LO WANG, BYLINE: Hi, Ari.

SHAPIRO: What does this Supreme Court ruling mean for the 2020 head count?

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Now let's turn to Ohio. It's a state that President Trump won easily in 2016, and it is in toss-up territory this year. The closure of an auto plant there is looming large. NPR White House correspondent Tamara Keith visited the site of the former plant.

A 25-year-old was infected twice with the coronavirus earlier this year, scientists in Nevada have confirmed. It is the first confirmed case of so-called reinfection with the virus in the U.S. and the fifth confirmed reinfection case worldwide.

The cases underscore the importance of social distancing and wearing masks even if you were previously infected with the virus, and they raise questions about how the human immune system reacts to the virus.

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Israel's health system has been buckling under a second wave of coronavirus infections, so it has enlisted the military to help, as NPR's Daniel Estrin reports from Jerusalem.

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Jon Bon Jovi Talks Band's New Album, '2020'

Oct 11, 2020

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And finally today, over the last 35 years, our next guest and his band have become known for inspirational rock anthems that have filled arenas around the world.

(SOUNDBITE OF SONG, "LIVIN' ON A PRAYER")

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