2020 Elections

During the final presidential debate of 2019, one of the moderators posed a question about a topic that rarely gets attention on the debate stage: What steps would candidates take to help disabled people get more integrated into the workforce and their local communities?

For Andrew Yang, the question was both political and personal. His oldest son, Christopher, is on the autism spectrum.

As other candidates report significant increases in fundraising, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren raised $21.2 million in the final three months of 2019, according to her presidential campaign, a drop from the $24.7 million she raised in the previous fundraising period.

The figure is also less than the totals that Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, former Vice President Joe Biden and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg took in between September and December.

Campaigns are reporting fundraising in three-month windows.

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

Julián Castro, the only Latino candidate in the Democratic field, has ended his presidential campaign.

Castro released a video on Twitter on Thursday, saying that his campaign had "stood up for the most vulnerable people" and had "given a voice to those who are often forgotten."

He adds in the video: "I'm not done fighting. I'll keep working toward a nation where everyone counts."

Castro served as secretary of housing and urban development in the Obama administration and, before that, was mayor of San Antonio, Texas.

Updated at 2:06 p.m. ET

A three-month window that began with a heart attack ended as Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders' strongest fundraising quarter yet.

Sanders' campaign announced it raised $34.5 million in October, November and December — nearly $10 million more than he had raised in the previous quarter. According to the campaign, $18 million came in from 900,000 individual donations in December alone, as Sanders drew larger and larger crowds to rallies in early voting states such as Iowa and New Hampshire.

The divide among Democrats over "Medicare for All" has dominated the policy conversation in the 2020 Democratic primary. But another rift has opened among Democrats, this one about college affordability. The question: Who should get to go to college for free?

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg jabbed at his more liberal opponents in a new ad airing in Iowa. It doesn't name other candidates, but it's clear he's taking aim at Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who have pitched plans making free public college available to all.

Purdue University Ag. Economics

Today:  There will be 50 new mayors taking office in 2020 in Indiana cities and towns.   Many campaigned during the elections on promises -- and must now turn those promises into policy.  Purdue University economist Larry DeBoer joins us from his West Lafayette campus office to talk about some of the issues the new mayors will face, and how the Indiana economy has evolved over the years to treat urban, suburban and rural communities differently. He talks about research going into a new formula that he will unveil later this year.  We also have this week's edition of "Building Northwest Indiana" from the Construction Advancement Foundation and another conversation from the Welcome Project at Valparaiso University.

Updated at 9:05 a.m. ET

Candidates seeking the Democratic presidential nomination took to the debate stage for the fifth time Wednesday night. There weren't any groundbreaking or game-changing moments, but here are five things that stood out:

1. Impeachment hearings may have taken some steam out of the debate

Let's face it: The biggest story of Wednesday was not the debate, it was the impeachment testimony of Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union.

Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's team filed paperwork for a presidential run on Thursday — but he's not in the race yet.

While Bloomberg's team filed a statement with the Federal Election Commission on Thursday creating a presidential campaign committee, aides to Bloomberg say the move should not be viewed as a final decision or announcement.

The Democratic presidential primary has taken a back seat to the impeachment inquiry over the past few months, so it's fitting that the fifth candidate debate will take place on the same day that the most anticipated impeachment witness, Ambassador to the EU Gordon Sondland, testifies before the House Intelligence Committee.

But a lot more than the path to impeachment has changed since the Democratic candidates last gathered on the debate stage.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick is officially joining the 2020 Democratic presidential race less than three months before voters start casting ballots.

"I admire and respect the candidates in the Democratic field. They bring a richness of ideas and experiences and depth of character that makes me proud to be a Democrat. But if the character of the candidates is an issue in every election, this time is about the character of the country," Patrick said in an announcement video published online Thursday morning.

Indiana Republican Attorney General Curtis Hill, who’s been accused of sexual misconduct by five women, officially announced his re-election bid Thursday.

Klobuchar: Woman with Buttigieg's record would miss debate

Nov 13, 2019

CHICAGO (AP) — Sen. Amy Klobuchar says she and other top female presidential candidates wouldn't be on the debate stage if they had the same experience as Mayor Pete Buttigieg (BOO'-tuh-juhj).

The Minnesota Democrat said Sunday on CNN that she believes the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, is qualified but that she's the better candidate.

Klobuchar says, "I'm the one from the Midwest that has actually won in a statewide race over and over again." She says of the female candidates: "Maybe we're held to a different standard."

Getty Images

Today:  On this "Reporters' Roundtable" Thursday we turn to Dan Carden of the "Times" and "Post-Tribune" reporter Michael Gonzalez to talk about the stories they posted online and had in the print editions this week.  Dan covered the announcement from U.S. Rep. Pete Visclosky that he would not seek re-election in 2020, and of two people who already are interested in seeking the longtime Congressman's seat -- Hammond Mayor Tom McDermott Jr. and North Township Trustee Frank Mrvan.  Dan also has the story about the Schererville town election where Councilman Michael Troxell won the Clerk-Treasurer's race.    Michael was in Portage on Election Night to watch how mayoral candidate John Cannon (who is serving out ex-Mayor James Snyder's term of office) and Sue Lynch did at the polls.  His story in the "Post-Tribune" detailed Lynch's election victory and post-election comments from Cannon.

U.S. Rep. Pete Visclosky announced he will not seek re-election in 2020. 

Updated at 6:10 p.m. ET

Former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke ended his presidential campaign on Friday after struggling to translate the energy from his 2018 Senate bid into a successful White House campaign.

"Our campaign has been about seeing clearly, speaking honestly and acting decisively in the best interests of America," O'Rourke wrote in a statement on Medium.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren has built a reputation as the presidential candidate with a plan for almost anything. Plans are her brand, so much so that her campaign shop sells T-shirts proclaiming "Warren has a plan for that."

On this edition of the podcast you'll hear the latest on additional fetal remains found earlier this week stashed in a car that had belonged to a doctor who performed abortions in Indiana, the City of Gary honored Richard Hatcher with a bronze statue in his likeness, Justin Hicks reports on planned protests in South Bend in response to US Attorney General William Barr speaking at a private event at Notre Dame Law School and Chris Nolte has a conversation with State Senator Eddie Melton following his announcement of a gubernatorial run .

Sen. Eddie Melton (D-Gary) officially kicked off his run for governor Tuesday after months of exploring a bid.

Indiana Senate Democrats

INDIANAPOLIS (AP) — A Democratic state senator is formally entering the Indiana governor's race with the state's Republican schools chief expected by his side.

First-term state Sen. Eddie Melton has a campaign announcement event set for Tuesday evening in his northwestern Indiana hometown of Gary. He filed state documents creating a gubernatorial campaign committee on Friday.

US Sen. Braun's Brother Suspends 5th District Campaign

Oct 7, 2019

The brother of Indiana US Senator Mike Braun is suspending his campaign for the 5th District Congressional seat because of an unnamed health issue.

In a written statement today, Steve Braun says he is “both frustrated and disappointed” to suspend his campaign.  The Republican filed his paperwork to run in 2020 in August.

WNDU-TV file photo

Today: On "Reporters' Roundtable,"  we talk to "Post-Tribune" reporter Grant Morgan about his stories posted online and in print -- including his story on news conferences held by Will County authorities and Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill about the fetal remains found in a Crete Twp. garage owned by the late Dr. Ulrich Klopfer. The investigation continues into the remains from Dr. Klopfer's womens'  clinics in northern Indiana.  Grant also has the latest on the Elkhart woman facing trial in U.S. District Court in Hammond for allegedly aiding ISIS.  A judge gave Samantha ElHassani's lawyers permission to seek depositions from three people in Iraq about her case.

New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio ended his campaign for president on Friday morning, acknowledging that he was unable to successfully pitch his progressive ideas to the Democratic electorate.

"I feel like I have contributed all I can to this primary election. It's clearly not my time, so I'm going to end my presidential campaign," de Blasio said on MSNBC's Morning Joe.

De Blasio's exit makes him the sixth candidate to drop out of the field, bringing the total number of Democrats seeking the nomination to 19.

Former Texas Rep. Beto O'Rourke gave a staunch defense of his gun control plan during Thursday's Democratic presidential primary debate, saying that as president, he would prioritize mandatory buybacks of assault-style weapons.

Quoting the candidate's past comment about selling back AR-15s and AK-47s, moderator David Muir asked O'Rourke: "Are you proposing taking away their guns? And how would this work?"

O'Rourke answered, "Hell, yes, we're going to take your AR-15, your AK-47."

Here's more of what he said:

The fate of the filibuster — a 60-vote threshold for most legislation in the U.S. Senate — is again an issue of controversy among Democratic presidential candidates.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren said the supermajority requirement is preventing Congress from passing popular bills — such as a background check bill.

Once again, health care took up a large chunk of a Democratic primary debate. Once again, there were fights over costs, coverage and whether the party is growing too extreme.

But this time, all of the front-runners were onstage together, providing the first opportunity for all of them to take direct aim at each other and their vastly differing health care plans. It made for some heated exchanges, putting "Medicare for All" supporters on defense. But it also showed clearly that some candidates are cautious not to criticize others' proposals too harshly.

Heading into Thursday's Democratic presidential debate, the third this campaign season, we had five political questions.

Here are those questions and how they got answered:

More than 16 years after the U.S. invasion of Iraq, former Vice President Joe Biden is still struggling to explain his vote for the war and when his feelings about intervention evolved.

On Thursday night, during the third Democratic debate, which took place in Houston, Biden said he "never should have voted to give [President] Bush the authority to go in and do what he said he was going to do."

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September's Democratic presidential debate has been narrowed to one night only, as more candidates have called it quits altogether.

There are now less than five months to go before the first votes are cast in the Democratic presidential nominating contest. So the spotlight is going to be even hotter on the 10 candidates who made the cut for Thursday's debate in Houston. (Follow NPR's live analysis here.)

Editor's Note on April 8, 2020: With the Democratic primary now down to one candidate, we're no longer updating the below graphic. But you can still see the stances of all candidates — past and present — below.


Donald Trump's immigration stances — family separation, a ban on immigrants from several majority-Muslim nations, the cancellation of the Deferred Action For Childhood Arrivals program, to name a few — have given Democrats much to criticize as the 2020 presidential election approaches.

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