CAFOs

South Bend Tribune

Today:  Jesse Kharbanda, executive director of the Hoosier Environmental Council, has the latest from the Statehouse on environmental bills still moving through the General Assembly, including two that are up for review in separate Environmental Affairs Committees this week.  The HEC's Kim Ferraro tells us about the Indiana Supreme Court decision on a request to review an appeals court case about "factory farms" and their impact on local farms and residents.  And  also speaking of the environment, we have another edition of "Green Fleet Radio," with Carl Lisek of South Shore Clean Cities.  "Off Mic" host Michael Puente spoke recently with Gary attorney Tony Walker about Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill's legal problems, and we revisit that conversation. Walker served as chairman of the state Supreme Court Disciplinary Commission.

Carolyn Jackson Facebook page

Today:  We continue our conversations with members of the northwest Indiana legislative delegation with state Representative Carolyn Jackson (D)(1)  -- who represents Hammond and Whiting.  She is one of the  lawmakers elected in the November 2018 election, filling the seat held by long-time Representative Linda Lawson.  She gives us her assessment of her first General Assembly session.  Kim Ferraro of the Hoosier Environmental Council talks about the 60-day notice of lawsuit issued to the owners of a proposed dairy farm in Newton County.  And "Dunes Action" co-founder Jim Sweeney is with u

IU Northwest

Today:   Northwest Indiana activist Ruth Needleman joins us in the studio to talk about --among other topics -- a look at some of the issues that could come up in the next General Assembly session, including Indiana teachers' pay, as well as the latest on the "Can We Talk" series of discussions leading toward the creation of a trauma center in Gary and "NWI Resistance's" proposed billboard against illegal immigration flights out of Gary-Chicago International Airport.  We have another conversation from the Welcome Project at Valparaiso University -- and Hoosier Environmental Council attorney

Indiana Pork Producers and a Hancock County family farm took their Statehouse testimony to a hog barn this week. The group is worried lawmakers will put more regulations on animal agriculture.

The legislature is studying large animal farms this summer – barns that hold hundreds to thousands of animals. The larger ones are known as CAFOS.

Hill Farms is slightly smaller. Heather Hill says regulations have become stricter over the decades.

A legislative study committee this week will wrap up its examination of the state’s confined animal feeding operations — barns that feed hundreds to thousands of animals, such as pigs, cows and chickens.

The hearings have drawn impassioned testimony from supporters and opponents alike. Many crop farmers say the extra income from CAFOs helps keep family farms alive. But opponents say CAFOs can pollute waterways and emit a debilitating odor.

Committee chair Sen. Sue Glick (R-LaGrange) says there is a place for large-scale animal agriculture in Indiana.

Ag Study Committee Talks CAFOs

Aug 29, 2017

In a meeting of the agriculture and natural resources study committee that featured very little new information, state lawmakers Tuesday heard from experts and state regulators on animal agriculture and concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs).

Committee members heard an overview of the state’s CAFO permitting process from the Indiana Department of Environmental Management.

And CAFO legislation expert Carolyn Orr told legislators big farm operations aren’t necessarily bad ones.

Opposing sides made one final pitch Wednesday to the Whitley County Plan Commission over buffers for confined animal feeding operations, or CAFOs.

Farmers and lakefront homeowners attended the meeting decked out, respectively, in green and blue shirts. They’ve disagreed for months on temporary buffers for confined animal feeding operations and ultimately failed to reach a compromise.

Homeowners asked the commission for a two mile buffer between CAFOs and nearby lakes; farmers wanted 1,000 feet. In the end, the commission decided on half a mile.

Half a dozen homeowners in rural Bartholomew County will get to pay less in property taxes because they live near concentrated animal feeding operations, or CAFOs.

The decision comes about a year after the families in the town of Hope appealed to the county about the impact of large hog farms on their home values.

After the county denied their requests in March, the neighbors appealed the case to the State Board of Tax Review.

Purdue University researchers are releasing new findings about how Indiana counties regulate big livestock farms, in hopes of determining what rules work best to help farmers get along with their neighbors.

Paul Ebner’s team at Purdue has spent years mapping out the wide range of zoning rules counties use to regulate confined animal feeding operations – known as CFOs – and their bigger, more concentrated counterparts, called CAFOs.

RoadsideArchitecture.com

Today:  Hammond Mayor Tom McDermott Jr. joins us to talk about the plans for a major Sportsplex to be built on some of the former Woodmar Shopping Center site.  When it's finished next summer, it'll be a building that the Mayor says will be larger than the state's largest similar structure, in the Indianapolis suburb of Westfield.   McDermott also updates us on the consent decree the city signed with U.S. EPA and IDEM that addresses compliance with orders to resolve sewage overflows into the Little Calumet and Grand Calumet Rivers.

 

Rural homeowners in Bartholomew County say a big, nearby hog farm – a concentrated animal feeding operation, or CAFO – is hurting their property values.

The county denied their bid to lower the CAFO neighbors’ property taxes, and argued the issue is too complex to codify, while residents say officials are just worried about politics and money.

A battle over the impact of a big hog farm on rural home values in Bartholomew County will go before the Indiana Board of Tax Review – but it will not lead to the broader regulatory changes some residents had hoped for.

On Tuesday, county officials denied individual property tax appeals from a group of neighbors who live near a concentrated animal feeding operation, or CAFO, in the town of Hope.

Joshua Claybourn - Vimeo

Today:  Josh Claybourn, an Indiana attorney, Republican and contributor to Howey Politics Indiana joins us to talk about his recent commentary about the first weeks of the Trump administration and its impact on the GOP.  He called it "a great fork in the road."