Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Coronavirus News Roundup: Tuesday, March 10th

Mar 10, 2020

Cases of the novel coronavirus –– or the disease caused by the virus, COVID-19 -- continue to mount throughout the Midwest. Some states have turned to closing K-12 schools or colleges.

Five years ago, Indiana experienced one of the nation’s worst HIV outbreaks. Mike Pence was governor then, and he approved a needle exchange to keep the problem from spreading. Now state leaders are debating whether that exchange — and others — can stay open.

The Indiana House made changes Thursday to legislation that raises the smoking and vaping age to 21 years old, which includes an effort to address recent deaths from vaping.

The Indiana Department of Health confirmed Thursday a fifth person has died from a vaping-related lung injury. That brings the total number of confirmed cases of lung injury linked to vaping to 56. 

A person has died in Elkhart County from a rare but deadly mosquito-borne virus that often affects horses. State health official say it's the first human case in Indiana in more than 20 years and only the fourth reported since 1964. 

Rare Virus Detected In Northern Indiana

Sep 12, 2019

A rare mosquito-borne virus has been detected in northern Indiana.

The state will receive $21 million over the next three years to prevent drug overdose deaths.

A large coalition — made up of doctors, legal experts, advocacy groups, and others — is petitioning the state to lower its threshold for when public health agencies should address elevated blood lead levels in children.

Study: Cow-Killing Tick Could Spread To Indiana

Jul 9, 2019

A tick that’s realtively new to the U.S. could easily creep into Indiana. A study by Rutgers University shows Indiana has the right climate for the Asian longhorned tick to thrive. 

(WFIU/WTIU)
Lauren Chapman

The opioid crisis has spurred some health providers to crack down on prescribing opioids. After a recent review, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has clarified guidelines that address this.

Public Health Funding Report Finds Indiana Behind

Apr 24, 2019

Indiana lags behind other states when it comes to public health funding, according to a new report.  The analysis examines what the state spends to prevent disease and injury.

An estimated 20 percent of Hoosiers smoke – one of the highest smoking rates in the country. Anti-smoking groups say the state could to more to prevent addiction. A new report finds Indiana spends 10.2 percent of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s recommended amount.

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Courtesy Purdue University

Today’s nurses may be using outdated materials that keep them from training future moms how to properly breastfeed. But Purdue engineering students are unveiling a device to aid them.

One Case Lands Indiana On Measles Watchlist

Aug 23, 2018
A rash forms on a person with measles 3-5 days after they contract the virus. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
Lauren Chapman

Indiana is one of 21 states the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention placed on a watch list for measles.  The state has had one reported case of measles. It takes three to declare an outbreak. 

New data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention finds only 15 percent of Hoosiers get the recommended amount of weekly physical activity. 

The guidelines were established in 2008 and include weekly aerobic activity and muscle strengthening exercise.  The CDC data from 2010-2015 ranks Hoosiers 47th nationwide for meeting the recommendations.

Only 10 percent of Indiana’s women meet the levels.   

WMUB Public Media

Today:   we continue our conversation on the proposed solid waste materials recovery facility in Gary with "the other side" of the issue.  Sam Henderson, an attorney for the Hoosier Environmental Council, is in the studio to talk about the concerns that the HEC and local citizens, businesses and educational organizations like the Steel City Academy about Maya Energy LLC's proposal. 

Louis Arevalo holds his Truvada pills at his home in Los Angeles, California on July 17, 2015. The drug Truvada, used to halt HIV infection, has been shown to be over 90 percent effective when used correctly.
Heidi de Marco / Kaiser Health News

An analysis released Wednesday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention provides further links between syringe services programs and preventing HIV. 

New numbers from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention show Indiana has a significant increase in overdoses cases.

The report examines the most recent data on overdoses at emergency departments. Indiana experienced a 35 percent increase in visits a trend that Indianapolis EMS medical director Dan O’Donnell says isn’t surprising.

Epidemiologists traditionally have depended on what people say to discover how disease spreads. But in investigating Indiana's recent HIV outbreak, the CDC tracked what the virus says — by looking at its DNA.

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CREATIVE COMMONS/PIXABAY

Indiana spent more money on anti-smoking programs this year than last. But it’s still a lot less than the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends.

A shortages of qualified treatment providers is frequently cited as an obstacle in fighting the opioid addiction crisis. Yet, according to research published in the journal PLoS One, the solution may lie in the hands of primary care providers who can successfully treat addiction.

A group of 12 contiguous U.S. states in the Midwest and South has the highest rate of adult tobacco use in the nation. If taken as a country, this group would rank among those with the highest smoking rates in the world.

This is according to a report released by Truth Initiative last week. Indiana is one of these twelve states, along with neighboring Ohio, Michigan, West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, Arkansas, Oklahoma and Missouri.

Cultural, Economic, Historical Factors Drive Black Breast-Feeding Gap

Sep 7, 2017
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Sarah Fentem / Side Effects Public Media

Tahwii Spicer gave birth to her son Reece almost two years ago at home with the help of a midwife. She said almost as soon as he was born, he "army-crawled" up her body to start feeding.

“He was so ravenous!” she said. “He was hungry.

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Jake Harper / Side Effects

Indiana’s top law enforcement officer, Attorney General Curtis Hill, has accused the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of manipulating facts in order to push a “pro-needle-exchange agenda.” He made the accusation in a statement released Tuesday.