eLearning

Corey Ohlenkamp/The Star Press

Today: We talk with Ball State University professor Michael Hicks, the director of the Center for Business and Economic Research, about a new report just released that reviews the impact that the "digital divide" in Indiana schools and communities may have on students' abilities for e-learning when classes resume, in some form, this academic year. The report indicates that more than 84,000 K-12 students do not have the Internet access they need for proper learning -- and not all of the deficiencies are in rural school districts.  We find out more about the new social media group "Out in LaPorte" from PFLAG board member Esther Stiles.   And we bring back our conversation with Purdue University economist Larry DeBoer on a lengthy study about the impact of the pandemic the recession it caused for local, county and state government.

As the weather gets colder and tougher to navigate with ice and snow, many schools will likely use scheduled make-up days when kids can’t get to class. But more are using what’s called eLearning instead of cancelling school, and the state has made it easier for them to do so.

Indiana is no stranger to school closures due to bad weather, but increased eLearning options have allowed more schools to avoid extending the academic year into summer.

A school year is 180 instructional days, but what that instruction looks like in Indiana has shifted in recent years to include more eLearning, or days when students stay home and access assignments through a computer.

State Department of Education eLearning Director Candice Dodson, says schools can use eLearning days for several reasons.