Graduation Requirements

Lauren Chapman/IPB News

On this edition of the podcast the you’ll hear the latest on school closures in Indiana due to the COVID-19 pandemic, Indiana is changing its high school graduation requirements for the class of 2020, Indiana jobless claims surged to 120,000 last week and Chris Nolte has a conversation with Victor Garcia, executive director of the Food Bank of NWI. He will share the latest on emergency support in response to COVID-19 . All of that, and more, on this edition of “Lakeshore Update”…

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Rebecca Green

Parents are among those concerned over new graduation requirements approved by the State Board of Education in December. Parents joined other stakeholders in a meeting held at Northwest Allen County Schools Tuesday night.


Some education leaders are asking the State Board of Education this week to reject a recommendation to overhaul high school graduation requirements.

The proposal would make students satisfy three conditions to qualify for graduation.

It would also let students choose a so-called college or career pathway. Ideally, this would allow a student to tailor their classes, extracurricular activities or internships to a particular job, joining the military or college.

A state committee recommended sweeping changes to high school graduation requirements Tuesday even as many of the details remain unknown.

If approved by the State Board of Education students, starting with the class of 2023, would choose from multiple academic tracts to satisfy three graduation requirements that are designed to better prepare them for college or career.

Members of a State Board of Education committee tasked with proposing new ways for students to qualify for graduation began sketching their plan Tuesday.

There’s still a lot for the dozen-plus members to sort out before their last meeting next month.

But a list of nine alternative ways students could become eligible for a diploma has begun to take shape. It includes: earning industry-recognized credentials; passing the military entrance exam plus enlisting; and work-based learning with job experience.

 

Starting next year, students will have a new way to qualify for high school graduation.

What it will be, or how many options they can choose from, is still unknown.

A committee of lawmakers, education leaders, lobbyists and others are trying to hash out new, so-called “pathways” for students to earn a diploma.

Discussion continues on how to overhaul high school graduation requirements to better prepare students for workforce and college.

A 2017 state law calls for rethinking different ways students can prove they are ready to graduate instead of the traditional end-of-course exams required to earn a diploma.