HIP 2.0

U.S. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar joins Gov. Eric Holcomb and Indiana Family and Social Services Administration Secretary Jennifer Walthall to announce Indiana's HIP approval in February. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Lauren Chapman

A group of non-profits organizations sent a letter to Governor Eric Holcomb this week, urging him to reconsider a new Healthy Indiana Plan, HIP, rule.  

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Sarah Fentem / Side Effects Public Media

Members who fail to renew coverage under Indiana’s Medicaid program will be subject to a six-month suspension period. That’s despite previous notice in 2016 from the federal government that the state can’t enforce such lockouts.

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Sarah Fentem / Side Effects Public Media

The federal government has granted a one-month extension to Indiana’s Medicaid program, known as the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0, which was set to expire this month.

This buys time for the state and federal government to finalize details of how the program works, according to a press release from Gov. Eric Holcomb's office. 

The federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has announced it will support state policies that require people to work for their Medicaid coverage. Ten states —including Indiana and Kentucky — have submitted proposals to add a so-called work requirement to their Medicaid plans.

It’s the last week for open enrollment on the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance marketplace as the window closes Dec. 15. Health insurance experts say it’s business as usual despite a number of changes that have caused some confusion this year.

A shortened enrollment period is the most obvious difference for people signing up on the Marketplace this year. Reduced promotion and federal fighting over repeal of the law has added to uncertainty says Care Source Indiana’s Steve Smitherman.

Public Health Study Committee Wraps Up Summer Work

Oct 26, 2017

A legislative study committee on public health issues voted Thursday to recommend the General Assembly take action on diabetes and the state’s nursing shortage as it wrapped up its work ahead of the next legislative session.

In recent years diabetes action plans have failed at the Statehouse. But this year’s study committee showed momentum.

Eskenazi pharmacist Jasmine Gonzolva, a non-legislative member of the committee, says much of the focus is on screening and prevention.

Cancer continues to be a leading cause of death for middle-aged Americans but the number of people seeking care for the disease is increasing.

A newly published paper in JAMA Oncology was co-authored by Indiana University professor Kosali Simon, who says the Affordable Care Act is to thank for an overall 33 percent decline in uninsured new cancer patients.

She says the study begs questions about when a diagnosis is made.

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cgpgrey.com

The GOP’s latest Obamacare overhaul proposal could significantly reduce funding for state Medicaid programs and turn expansion plans — including Indiana’s HIP 2.0 — on their heads.

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Washington State House Republicans / https://www.flickr.com/photos/wahousegop/

The House Republicans’ replacement plan for the Affordable Care Act—otherwise known as Obamacare—would gradually phase out enrollment in Medicaid expansion programs such as Indiana’s Healthy Indiana Plan.


 

With some federal lawmakers aiming to repeal the Affordable Care Act, state legislative leaders say the future of Indiana’s health care program, HIP 2.0, is uncertain.

U.S. Sen. Todd Young (R-Ind.) visited the Statehouse last week. And State House Speaker Brian Bosma says one of the things Young talked about was federal health care reform.

Note: This story was updated at 11 p.m. February 22, 2017. 

The federal government is welcoming public comment on an application to renew Indiana’s Medicaid program until March 17. The program needs federal approval to continue because its design is an experiment: Unlike Medicaid expansions in other states, the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0, requires members to make monthly payments. Now Indiana has to argue that the experiment is working.

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Wikimedia Commons

In 2015, Indiana expanded its Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act. The Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0, extended coverage to about 250,000 low-income Hoosiers who were not previously eligible. Amid the turmoil in Washington over what to do with Obamacare, Indiana has applied to keep the program running for three more years.

Tuesday Marks Final Day For ACA Enrollment

Jan 31, 2017

The final day to enroll in the Affordable Care Act, ACA Health Insurance Marketplace is January 31.

Although final numbers haven’t been released yet, at last report, more than 167,500 Hoosiers had enrolled through the ACA marketplace. And about a quarter of them are first-time ACA enrollees this period.

Mark Fairchild is the director of public policy with Covering Kids and Families of Indiana and says the new enrollees prove the ACA increases coverage.

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Jim Nix / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimnix/6168273244

Approximately 1,000 Hoosiers showed up in Indianapolis Sunday to protest congressional efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. The rally was organized by a coalition of local and state-wide organizations, including Planned Parenthood, the Indiana Democratic Party and the state chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America.

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Jake Harper / Side Effects

If she’s confirmed, Indiana policy consultant Seema Verma will start work as Donald Trump’s pick to lead the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. She’ll bring her experience designing Indiana’s unique Medicaid expansion to the national policy conversation.