IDOE

FILE PHOTO: Rebecca Thiele / IPB News

The Indiana Department of Education released an online resource in partnership with Purdue University to help teachers teach climate change in schools. Several teachers we interviewed last year said they struggle to find credible materials on climate change for their lesson plans.

Jeanie Lindsay / IPB News

Indiana's moratorium on evictions is set to expire this week and additional pandemic unemployment benefits have already ended, and schools are on edge for what it could mean for students with unstable housing. 

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Lawmakers approved several new education laws during the legislative session earlier this year, and many go into effect with the new fiscal year, July 1.

Jeanie Lindsay

The Indiana Department of Education is rejecting the latest guidance from Education Secretary Betsy DeVos about how to share emergency school funding with private schools, after it spurred pushback from education leaders at all levels. 

FILE PHOTO: Peter Balonon-Rosen / IPB News

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos's latest guidance on emergency relief money for K-12 schools has education leaders puzzled. The U.S. Department of Education's recent directive means private schools will get a larger share of emergency aid funding – while low-income schools will get less.

Seven Indiana schools have closed due to the flu so far. And several others are reporting high absentee rates. But state education officials say there’s no cause for concern. 

The state is handing down a series of corrective action requirements for a career center school in Bedford after a local school superintendent called for an audit earlier this year.

State Releases New ILEARN Sample Questions

May 21, 2018

The State Department of Education (IDOE) has released sample questions for Indiana’s new standardized test that rolls out next year.

Elementary and middle school students will first take the state’s new ILEARN assessment in Spring 2019, and the sample item release offers a first look at the new exam created with test-writer group American Institutes for Research.

Lawmakers Remove Unlicensed Teacher Provision From Bill

Mar 12, 2018
Jeanie Lindsay / IPB News

Lawmakers from both chambers say they agree on a final version of a teacher licensing bill that stirred controversy in recent weeks.

 

At first, the bill would have let the state waive some content licensing requirements for new teachers. Then the House changed that measure, to let schools hire a certain percentage of unlicensed teachers. But Sen. Andy Zay (R-Huntington), the bill’s author, says language aimed at getting more teachers fast-tracked into the classroom was too confusing.

 

The standardized test that will replace Indiana’s ISTEP will take students significantly less time to complete, according to estimates from the Indiana Department of Education.

Indiana has the largest voucher program in the nation, but a recent report shows growth for the program is slowing down.

A House committee has approved legislation to track foster children and their success in schools.

The bill would require the Indiana Department of Education and the Department of Child Services to gather data on foster care students in public schools – specifically, the graduation rates and enrollment data for those students.

Deb Brewer is the regional director of a foster care and family services group called The Villages of Indiana, and she says that data could mean more support for foster children.

IDOE Releases 2017 Graduation Rate Data

Jan 12, 2018

The Department of Education released 2017 graduation rate data Friday.

The department reports the statewide graduation rate landed around 87 percent – two points lower than in 2016.

Cursive Writing Debate Back At The Statehouse

Jan 4, 2018

The debate about teaching cursive to Hoosier kids has returned to the statehouse, and the lawmaker behind the cursive writing bill has shown no signs of backing down from the issue.

Sen. Jean Leising (R-Oldenburg) has filed legislation every year since 2011 that would require elementary schools to teach cursive, and it’s died every year in the House of Representatives. But Leising says she won’t give up.

“I can’t hardly go anywhere in my district without someone speaking to me about ‘what are you doing about cursive? This is ridiculous,’” she says.