Indiana Youth Institute President Tami Silverman

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Today:  Besides a look at Indiana Humanities' "INSeparable" 2019 initiative as described by the organization's CEO Keira Amstutz, we talk about child abuse and neglect and  early childhood education.  Tami Silverman of the Indiana Youth Institute focuses on Child Abuse Prevention Month in her April comments,  and Regional Health Systems CEO Bob Krumwied joins us in the studio to talk about his organization and the latest expansion of Geminus Head Start's St.

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Today:  The Mascot Hall of Fame officially opened to the public in Whiting and we have two conversations -- first, with the Executive Director of the mascot-themed interactive childrens' museum, Orestes Hernandez and then, with Whiting Mayor Joe Stahura on the important economic development benefits that the Hall of Fame bring to his city.  We also have another edition of "Green Fleet Radio," from South Shore Clean Cities.  Host Carl Lisek talks with an executive with ChargePoint, which supports electric vehicles.

Chicago Tribune

Today:   On this "Reporters Roundtable Thursday," we asked "Chicago Tribune" and "Post-Tribune" reporter Michael Hawthorne to talk about his story this week on how an industrial neighbor to homes in Whiting has reportedly contaminated the air, an area already loaded with contaminated soils.  Giles Bruce of the "Times" also joins us, along with "Post-Tribune" reporter Greg Tejeda, to talk about their stories in print and online.  And Lakeshore Public Radio's Sharon Jackson has a conversation with Indiana Youth Institute executive Tami Silverman on the high opioid and nicotine use in Indiana,

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Today:    Tami Silverman, the presuident and CEO of the Indiana Youth Institute, joins us to talk about the new state Legislature-mandated training sessions for all Indiana teachers and educators in grades 5-12 on youth suicide awareness and prevention.  Hoosier youth are more likely to consider or attempt suicide than their peers nationally, according to IYI data.  Indiana also faces significant disparities in youth suicide among the vulnerable groups,. and among the different sizes of school districts in the state. 

South Shore CVA

Today:    We begin with a conversation with Lauren Radusin and Ellen Kapitan, members of the South Shore Roller Girls roller derby team.  The team is approaching its 5th birthday and will observe it with a Birthday Bout and doubleheader in Hammond on July 14th.  But first, the Roller Girls are inviting everyone to an open call-out on July 8th in Portage -- and you don't have to know how to skate to participate.

Today:  Michigan City Area Schools' Krueger Middle School is set up to study environmenntal sciences, and students there have already made inroads in recycling and composting.  We talk with enviromental sciences teacher Daisy Lee about the spring semester programs that will continue on into the next school year. 

Today:   We talk with Robin Minton-Holmes with the Center for Workforce Innovations and Allison Bertl, WorkOne business services manager, about the latest northwest Indiana Workforce Board report on the state of the Region's workforce and job markets available to those seeking employment.  Lakeshore Public Radio's Sharon Jackson also interviewed Heather Ennis with the Northwest Indiana Forum about the organization's work on a region-wide plan.

A new report from the National Institute on Drug Abuse finds teens are using many substances at historically low rates and Indiana teens are in line with national trends.

The annual Monitoring the Future study has tracked drug use trends for eighth, 10th and 12th graders for over 40 years.

Young adults in Indiana are struggling. Teens experience a growing number of social and emotional needs but support can be hard to come by in the one place they may turn: schools.

Teens at Fishers High School, in an affluent suburb of Indianapolis, may seem to have it made but many confront issues that could lead to larger problems. Mental health coordinator for Hamilton Southeastern Schools, Brooke Lawson says things recently got a little easier for these students.

“We were able to start this year with a mental health counselor in every building,” says Lawson.

An annual conference for Indiana youth workers was held in Indianapolis this week. It’s the largest gathering for these workers in the Midwest with over 1,300 attendees this year.

The Indiana Youth Institute has hosted The Because KIDS COUNT Conference for 16 years. CEO Tami Silverman says it’s a chance for Hoosiers who work with children in many settings including schools, foster care, after school or crisis centers to come together.

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Today:  a conversation with Indiana Youth Institute President and CEO Tami Silverman on IYI programs underway and planned in northwest Indiana, as well as a new "Race for Results" report that highlights achievement and outcome gaps between different racial groups of children in Indiana and around the country.  Tami also talks about the importance of instilling in youngsters a philanthropic attitude.

Children in Indiana’s minority and immigrant populations often have a more difficult start in life according to the conclusions of the latest look at disparity in wellbeing for Hoosier kids.

About 20 percent of Indiana’s population identifies as African-American, Hispanic, Asian or another non-white race.

Indiana Youth Institute President Tami Silverman says a new report from the Annie E. Casey foundation finds children in these households are less likely to benefit from opportunities to grow and develop.