Ivy Tech Community College

Post-Tribune/Chicago Tribune

Today:  We begin our conversations with northwest Indiana residents who want to succeed Congressman Pete Visclosky.  The longest-serving U.S. Representative from our area decided not to seek re-election and several have already made their intentions known to be on the Democratic Party ballot in the May 2020 primary election.  Valparaiso attorney Jim Harper is one of them.  We also bring back our conversation with Dee Dee White with Ivy Tech Community College, about the series of casino dealer traiming courses being offered that can provide jobs at local casinos, including the new Hard Rock Casino to be built in Gary. 

Ivy Tech Will Offer Free Tuition For Volunteer First Responders

Oct 24, 2019

Ivy Tech Community College and the Indiana Volunteer Firefighter’s Association have joined forces to offer a two-year degree to volunteer first responders in the state – at no charge.

Ivy Tech President Sue Ellspermann says the idea for the scholarship originated from a bill proposed by State Rep. Randy Frye (R-Greensburg) to address a growing shortage of first responders, particularly in rural areas. The bill didn’t pass this year, so Ivy Tech stepped in.

NWI Times - artist's rendering

Today:  We revisit our conversation with Dee Dee White, a workforce specialist with Ivy Tech Community College's Lake County campuses.  She talks about the casino dealer training courses underway and how they can link residents to new jobs proposed at the Hard Rock Casino in Gary.  State Senator Karen Tallian (D-Ogden Dunes) was with us to talk about the potential review of the two-year state budget that could happen in the next General Assembly session.  And school buses and other school district transportation projects are discussed in the latest edition of "Green Fleet Radio," supported by South Shore Clean Cities and NIRPC. Carl Lisek's guest is Amy Rosa of the Wa-Nee Community School Corp.

NWI Forum website

Today:  Heather Ennis with the Northwest Indiana Forum is our in-studio guest to talk about the months of work that will become a complete report called "Ignite the Region -- Northwest Indiana's Strategy for Economic Transformation."  The plan focuses on five areas including business development and marketing, talent and placemaking and infrastructure.  A luncheon on Thursday at Avalon Manor will offer an update by the people who've spent the past year on this project.  St.

Purdue University Northwest

Today:   We talk with Purdue University Northwest physics professor Neeti Parashar, who is on the team of 400 scientists looking into the origin of the universe -- and is a recipient of the 2019 High Energy and Particle Physics prize from the European Physical Society.  It involves what is called the "top quark."  Ivy Tech Community College K-12 initiatives director Caleb Westberg talks about a new collaboration between IVTC, River Forest Schools in Lake County and Praxair that will lead to more people qualified for top manufacturing jobs in the Region.  "Howey Politics Indiana" editor-pub

MVCC/SAIC websites

Today:  Ted Stalnos with the Calumet Area Industrial Commission talks about the organization that includes both Indiana and Illinois manufacturers and their mission of directing skilled workers to them, and how community colleges in both states are partners in the federal "Promise Grant" education program.  Celina Weatherwax with MAAC Foundation tells us about the Aug. 1st-4th World War II aircraft visit at Porter Regional Airport, and a special reception on Aug.

Indiana Parenting Institute web site

Today:    We invited Jena Balezza and Kendra Johnson with the Indiana Parenting Institute and Fred Jackson with the Indiana Commission for Higher Education's 21st Century Scholars Program into the studio to talk about the August 18th Northwest Indiana "Parent Celebration and Education Expo," to be held at Indiana University Northwest's Arts and Sciences Building in Gary.  It's an opportunity for parents to learn how the educational system works, the options it provides to families and how to access its benefits.  There are a lot of events and topics they'll discuss that will be featured th

A new partnership between the Indiana Chamber of Commerce and Ivy Tech Community College will make tuition discounts available to some Hoosier employees as part of an existing program at the 2-year college.

Ivy Tech’s Achieve Your Degree program connects Hoosiers with education programs – and financial aid options – to build their career credentials. The new partnership between Ivy Tech and the Indiana Chamber expands those efforts and includes a 5 percent discount on tuition costs not already covered by financial aid, for employees at the chamber’s member companies.

Pottawatomi Indian Nation

Today:  Ed Feigenbaum, the editor and publisher of "Indiana Gaming Insight" and "Indiana Political Insight" newsletters, joins us to review how Indiana casinos -- including the Northwest Indiana boats -- did in February. (Spoiler Alert: they're all hoping for a better month of March.)  Ed also talks about the 2018 General Assembly session, its successes and its failures -- especially in the final hours of the regular session.  Lawmakers are preparing for a short, special session in May.

nwitimes.com

Today:  We continue our look into active shooter preparedness in northwest Indiana, with a conversation with Portage Police Chief Troy Williams.  His department is preparing a series of workshops beginning on March 13th to address concerns about active shooter situations for not only schools, but churches and businesses.

Bloomington Herald-Times

Today:  Noted Indiana economist, speaker and writer Morton Marcus joins us once again to review the topics he brings up in his recent "Eye on the Pie" columns printed across the state on economic issues, including the state's workforce.

We revisit our conversation with Purdue University engineering graduate and inventor Ryan Frederickson, who came up with a different way to keep an opened bottle of wine fresh for months after the user first opens it.  It's called "ART Wine Refresher."

Ivy Tech Community College’s new strategic plan calls for more than doubling the number of degrees earned by students in the next five years.

Ivy Tech President Sue Ellspermann wants to boost certifications, certificates and degrees awarded statewide from about 21,000 to 50,000 annually by 2023.

She also wants to grow enrollment by more than 25 percent in the next five years from about 94,000 students to nearly 120,000 students.

To help reach that goal, the college is improving academic advising and offering eight-week classes to help recruit and retain students.

TheStatehouseFile.com

Today:  a pre-General Assembly conversation with State Rep. Hal Slager (R-Schererville) about the issues that could be discussed at the upcoming 30-day session that begins January 3rd.  They could range from the opioid crisis to hate crimes to Sunday liquor and beer sales to political redistricting and educational issues.

College-bound students often have a sea of information to navigate while making their post-high school plans, but the state has now partnered with a national nonprofit to make that easier.

Purdue University Northwest

Today:  A conversation with Richard Rupp, a Purdue University Northwest political scientist who's taken on the position of Chief of Staff to PNW Chancellor Thomas Keon.  We talk about his experiences on campus, including heading up projects that led to the opportunity to serve in a wider leadership capacity on both the Hammond and Westville campuses.

Nearly 10,000 people in Indiana are approved for benefits through Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program – also called DACA – which protects undocumented immigrants who came to the U.S. as children, and thousands more could be eligible, according to the Migration Policy Institute.

The Trump administration confirmed Tuesday it will end DACA in six months, but Hoosier enrollees and advocates hope Congress will intervene before then.

Larry Brechner

Ivy Tech Community College in Gary is partnering with Indiana University Northwest in the use of the new Arts & Sciences Building, which will be officially dedicated on Friday.   Vice chancellor for academic affairs Margaret Semmer was on "Regionally Speaking" on Wednesday, as the conversation continued about the new building along Broadway at 35th Avenue. 

Inside Indiana Business

Today:  a conversation with Jeff Strack, the chief executive of Indiana Grocery Group, the company that now owns and operates 20 of northwest Indiana's most popular supermarkets.  The group purchased some of the Strack & VanTil stores, along with a few Town & Country and Ultra stores, from Central Grocers in U.S. bankruptcy court.  Jeff talks about the process of creating a brand-new company  -- setting up the wholesale agreements to replace Central Grocers -- and planning for the future.

Larry Brechner

On Friday, August 25th, Indiana University Northwest will officially open its new $45 million Arts & Sciences Building.

Indiana says it wants to help train train more Hoosier workers for in-demand jobs. Two grant programs will help cover tuition for career certificates and training costs for employers in what the state calls “high-demand” areas.

The legislature approved $10 million apiece over two years for the two programs – the Workforce Ready Grant and the Employer Training Grant.

Federal Budget Puts Low-Income College Grants On Chopping Block

Mar 21, 2017

The newest federal budget presented by President Donald Trump dramatically reduces money for grants designed to help low-income students go to college.

The budget would eliminate the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants, money for students with exceptional financial need, and proposes a $3.9 billion reduction in Pell Grants, the primary federal college grant program.

A new report from the Indiana Commission for Higher Education says a rising number of people are getting educational certificates from two-year Indiana colleges, which may help fill the state’s open manufacturing jobs.

The CHE report focuses on credit-bearing certificates – the kind college students can earn in less than one or two years, from programs that “commonly have a career or occupational focus.”

In Indiana, CHE found a 32 percent increase in production of these certificates since 2012, mostly from two-year public schools like Ivy Tech Community College.