Lilly Endowment

Chicago Tribune website

Today:  We hear from two northwest Indiana school district superintendents on their reopening plans for classes this fall: first, from School City of Hammond superintendent Scott Miller and, later, from Merrillville Community Schools superintendent Nick Brown, speaking with Sharon Jackson.  In between, Indiana Youth Institute president and CEO Tami Silverman is with us to talk about the help that the Lilly Endowment and the state organization of United Ways is doing to help Hoosier nonprofits that serve young people -- agencies which have been affected by the coronavirus pandemic.   The Lilly Endowment is creating a $20 million fund to help youth-serving organizations that it calls the Youth Program Resilience Fund. 

Junior Achievement of Central Indiana wrapped up their annual two-day career fair Wednesday in Indianapolis. More than 10,000 students from across central Indiana schools attended to learn about careers.

John Affleck-Graves, executive vice president of Notre Dame, addresses an audience on Friday at the grant announcement in Elkhart, Indiana.
Justin Hicks

The University of Notre Dame announced Friday, April 26, that it was awarded a $42.4 million grant from the Lilly Endowment. They’ll use that money to partner with businesses in the South Bend - Elkhart area that promote workforce and economic growth.

Survey: Parents Fear For Child Safety In Schools

Jul 17, 2018

One in three parents fear for their child’s safety in school, according to a survey that a national education group conducts every year.

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Stan Jastrzebski / WBAA News

A ten-county area of West Central Indiana is about to get a nearly $40 million investment from the Lilly Endowment aimed at making farming and related industries more internet-compatible.

The cash is going to the Wabash Heartland Innovation Network, or WHIN (pronounced “win”), which will send the cash to Purdue University as research seed money.

Young adults in Indiana are struggling. Teens experience a growing number of social and emotional needs but support can be hard to come by in the one place they may turn: schools.

Teens at Fishers High School, in an affluent suburb of Indianapolis, may seem to have it made but many confront issues that could lead to larger problems. Mental health coordinator for Hamilton Southeastern Schools, Brooke Lawson says things recently got a little easier for these students.

“We were able to start this year with a mental health counselor in every building,” says Lawson.