Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor

Guy Rhodes Photography website

Today:  we revisit our conversation with northwest Indiana native and photographer Guy Rhodes.  He was fortunate to be able to go to South Korea to photograph members of the U.S. Winter Olympics team.  He's posted several of his photos in U.S. media during the Olympics as well as on his web site.

We also bring you another edition of "Green Fleet Radio," supported by South Shore Clean Cities.  Carl Lisek's guest today is the director of the Port of Indiana - Burns Harbor, Ian Hurt.

Indiana’s ports move millions of tons each year of the stuff that’s made and used at Midwest factories, including steel, grains and coal. The three ports – one on Lake Michigan and two on the Ohio River – connect Indiana to the national and global economies, and each has to find its own ways to keep up with change.

For the first part of a three-part series, we visited the Port of Indiana-Burns Harbor to see how it’s secured its place in the steel industry.

Indiana’s three ports had their second-best start to the year ever in 2017.

Burns Harbor, Mt. Vernon and Jeffersonville moved 19 percent more cargo in the first six months of this year than at the same time in 2016 – 5.7 million tons overall.

Almost two-thirds of that went through the southwest port of Mt. Vernon, in the form of bulk cargoes – things like coal, ethanol, fertilizer and minerals, which get transferred between railcars, river barges and trucks.

The welton Wire

Today: We find out more about Thursday afternoon's 10th Annual Diversity Business Job Fair and Symposium, to be held at Avalon Manor in Merrillville.  The event is free and open to the public.  The event coordinator is "Times" classified ad manager Roxanne Olejnik. 

Indiana’s ports system hopes a new contractor will help bring more bulk cargo than ever into Burns Harbor on Lake Michigan.

Metro Ports is a stevedoring company. It helps manage how cargo gets off- and on-loaded and distributed at 27 ports in 10 states, including huge facilities at Long Beach, California and Seattle-Tacoma, Washington.

Burns Harbor will be the company’s first Great Lakes operation when it takes over the bulk cargo terminal next month.

Marine Link

The Port of Indiana - Burns Harbor handled nearly 2.6 million tons of cargo in 2016, down from 2.8 million tons the previous year. But - despite the volume decrease - The Ports of Indiana says last year's tonnage brought the port to its highest three-year total in history.

More than 8.6 million tons of cargo have been handled at Burns Harbor since 2014.

The Ports of Indiana says grain shipments in 2016 were up 57 percent over the previous year while mineral and oil shipments increased 19 percent. Coal was up 11 percent as well.

Sharon Jackson / Lakeshore Public Media

The "Making Lake Michigan Great" tour is underway, and the research vessel W.G. Jackson visited the Port of Indiana Burns Harbor. Dr. Janet Vail, Supervisor of the Education and Outreach program aboard the boat, says the tour started in 1998 and has visited 33 ports of call on Lake Michigan since it began.