SAT

FILE PHOTO: Peter Balonon-Rosen / IPB News

Indiana has chosen the SAT as the high school exam students will take as part of the transition to new graduation requirements. The change is happening as more colleges and universities across the country adopt test-optional policies for admissions.

State Unveils ISTEP+ Results For 10th Graders

Sep 19, 2019

Indiana’s 10th graders passed their final state assessment at about the same rate as last year, according to ISTEP scores the state made available this week.

Ball State Sees 28 Percent Test Optional College Applications

Dec 14, 2018

More than a quarter of high school students who hope to join Ball State University in the fall of 2019 are submitting applications without standardized test scores.  As IPR’s Stephanie Wiechmann reports, this is the first year SAT or ACT scores are optional for admission to the Muncie school.

When Ball State announced in July it would become a “test-optional” university, it wasn’t the first Indiana college to do so.  But it was the largest public university on the list.

Ball State Makes College Entrance Exams Optional

Jul 30, 2018

More Hoosier students won’t have to take the ACT or SAT – if they’re applying to certain schools.  As IPR’s Stephanie Wiechmann reports, Ball State University says it won’t require the two most common college entrance exams for undergrad hopefuls.

 For students applying to Ball State University for the fall of 2019 and beyond, submitting scores from the SAT or ACT will be optional.  Ball State President Geoffrey Mearns says research shows the stronger measure of student academic success is a high school grade point average.

Indiana’s new graduation pathways will include college entrance exams as one gatekeeper to graduation for some students, but the U.S. Department of Education says that means schools must take extra care to follow student data privacy laws.

Diploma, Grad Pathways Focus Of New House Bill

Jan 23, 2018

A heated debate broke out during a House committee’s discussion of a new graduation pathways bill Tuesday, as one lawmaker tried to make a big change to the legislation.

The State Board of Education approved a controversial rewrite of the high school graduation requirements Wednesday in the face of opposition from school leaders, teachers, parents and professional associations.

During nearly six hours of public comment before the vote, dozens of educators asked for more time to vet the plan since the cost and details around implementation are unknown.

Earlier, more than 200 school leaders, teachers, and officials wrote letters to the state education department raising concerns with the proposal.

A state committee recommended sweeping changes to high school graduation requirements Tuesday even as many of the details remain unknown.

If approved by the State Board of Education students, starting with the class of 2023, would choose from multiple academic tracts to satisfy three graduation requirements that are designed to better prepare them for college or career.

Members of a State Board of Education committee tasked with proposing new ways for students to qualify for graduation began sketching their plan Tuesday.

There’s still a lot for the dozen-plus members to sort out before their last meeting next month.

But a list of nine alternative ways students could become eligible for a diploma has begun to take shape. It includes: earning industry-recognized credentials; passing the military entrance exam plus enlisting; and work-based learning with job experience.

 

Starting next year, students will have a new way to qualify for high school graduation.

What it will be, or how many options they can choose from, is still unknown.

A committee of lawmakers, education leaders, lobbyists and others are trying to hash out new, so-called “pathways” for students to earn a diploma.

The Indiana Senate approved a bill Tuesday setting guidelines for ILEARN, a new standardized test that will replace the troubled ISTEP+ exam in 2019.

The proposal would require the test, for students in grades 3-8, be given on a computer and allow Indiana scores to be compared with scores nationally.