State Board of Education

More personnel changes are coming to the State Board of Education. As one member sent the governor his letter of resignation this week, and some others come to the end of their terms later this month.

Melton To Explore Gubernatorial Run

Jun 4, 2019
Sen. Eddie Melton (D-Gary) will explore a run for governor. (FILE PHOTO: Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Sen. Eddie Melton (D-Gary) will announce Tuesday evening he’s exploring a bid for governor.

Melton is the first Democrat to take formal steps towards a 2020 gubernatorial run.

Howe, Manual Could Become Charter Schools After Takeover Ends But IPS Warns of Financial Pitfalls

Mar 6, 2019

Two Indianapolis high schools under state intervention could become charter schools instead of facing closure, the State Board of Education decided Wednesday, despite concerns raised by Indianapolis Public Schools.

Officials have finally released results for the state’s standardized test, the ISTEP, after grading issues postponed their publication last month.

The state’s first set of coalition schools received approval from the State Board of Education Wednesday. The group of districts will waive some state requirements to change how they offer career and technical education, or CTE.

Dr. Byron Ernest is the secretary of the Indiana State Board of Education. (Eric Weddle/WFYI News)
Jeanie Lindsay

Changes to education in Indiana are coming over the next two years with new standardized tests and federal education law, but members of the State Board of Education plan to postpone another shift around school accountability.

Diploma, Grad Pathways Focus Of New House Bill

Jan 23, 2018

A heated debate broke out during a House committee’s discussion of a new graduation pathways bill Tuesday, as one lawmaker tried to make a big change to the legislation.

School Principals Share Concerns On New Grad Pathways

Jan 11, 2018

School principals are concerned about the state’s plan to change high school graduation pathway requirements. Some say it lacks important details on how schools can bring that plan to life.

State Board Approves School Grading System Proposal

Jan 10, 2018

Significant changes are in store for the state’s school grading system, but the State Board of Education had trouble finding a starting point at its first meeting of 2018.

The State Department of Education worked on a new education plan last year due to the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, or ESSA. That included possible changes to the way Indiana grades schools, but at their monthly meeting Wednesday, the Board of Education approved a plan with some key differences.

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Rebecca Green

Parents are among those concerned over new graduation requirements approved by the State Board of Education in December. Parents joined other stakeholders in a meeting held at Northwest Allen County Schools Tuesday night.

The State Board of Education approved a sweeping new plan for high school graduation pathways this month, but the recent decision has caused some concern for schools, and major questions remain.

The new plan aims to make sure students have more employable skills before they leave high school – through things like an after school job, or service or research projects. But Indiana Small and Rural Schools Association director Christopher Lagoni says there are still important, unanswered questions.

The State Board of Education approved a controversial rewrite of the high school graduation requirements Wednesday in the face of opposition from school leaders, teachers, parents and professional associations.

During nearly six hours of public comment before the vote, dozens of educators asked for more time to vet the plan since the cost and details around implementation are unknown.

Earlier, more than 200 school leaders, teachers, and officials wrote letters to the state education department raising concerns with the proposal.


Some education leaders are asking the State Board of Education this week to reject a recommendation to overhaul high school graduation requirements.

The proposal would make students satisfy three conditions to qualify for graduation.

It would also let students choose a so-called college or career pathway. Ideally, this would allow a student to tailor their classes, extracurricular activities or internships to a particular job, joining the military or college.

A state committee recommended sweeping changes to high school graduation requirements Tuesday even as many of the details remain unknown.

If approved by the State Board of Education students, starting with the class of 2023, would choose from multiple academic tracts to satisfy three graduation requirements that are designed to better prepare them for college or career.

Members of a State Board of Education committee tasked with proposing new ways for students to qualify for graduation began sketching their plan Tuesday.

There’s still a lot for the dozen-plus members to sort out before their last meeting next month.

But a list of nine alternative ways students could become eligible for a diploma has begun to take shape. It includes: earning industry-recognized credentials; passing the military entrance exam plus enlisting; and work-based learning with job experience.

The board of the chronically failing Hoosier Academies Virtual School voted Tuesday not to seek renewal of their charter, a decision that will cause the school of 2,000 students to close in June.

John Marske, Hoosier Academies board president, told WFYI News in an email Wednesday that the school had until Oct. 1 to submit a renewal application.

 

Starting next year, students will have a new way to qualify for high school graduation.

What it will be, or how many options they can choose from, is still unknown.

A committee of lawmakers, education leaders, lobbyists and others are trying to hash out new, so-called “pathways” for students to earn a diploma.

The federal Every Student Succeeds Act mandates how states’ hold their schools accountable.

This fall the Indiana Department of Education will submit its plan as required by the law for how to will improve graduation rates, increase English-language proficiency and offer help to the lowest-performing schools – among many other issues.

Senate Panel Moves Forward ISTEP Replacement Bill

Mar 29, 2017

A bill to overhaul Indiana’s standardized testing system passed out of a Senate committee Wednesday, but some lawmakers say the legislation does little to clear up concerns with over testing.

House Bill 1003 sets up guidelines for a new state test that will replace the ISTEP+ and graduation requirement exams by 2019.