Statewide News

A new study highlights the difference in cancer-related beliefs, behaviors and preventative measures.

Indiana ACLU, East Allen County Schools Settle

Jan 18, 2019

The American Civil Liberties Union of Indiana and East Allen County Schools today reached an agreement to a lawsuit filed in November on behalf of the Leo Pride Alliance club at Leo Junior, Senior High School.

 

The lawsuit alleged school administrators prohibited the club from describing itself as a GSA, or Gay Straight Alliance and imposed other restrictions on club members.

 

Holcomb Names New State Veterans Affairs Director

Jan 18, 2019

Gov. Eric Holcomb has named a new director for the state’s Department of Veterans Affairs. This comes after the resignation of the former director following complaints about misuse of military relief dollars at the agency.

Gov. Eric Holcomb unveiled a teacher pay proposal in his State of the State. A Department of Child Services bill cleared committee. And House Republicans then rebuffed an effort to strengthen that bill.

Indiana ended 2018 with an unemployment rate about nine percent worse than where it started the year. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Indiana ended 2018 with an unemployment rate about 9 percent worse than where it started the year.

Three Dead, One Wounded In Owensboro Shooting

Jan 17, 2019
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Isaiah Seibert / WNIN

Three people are dead and one wounded after a shooting at a home in Owensboro, Kentucky. Police were responding to a request for a welfare check when officers found the victims.

Lawmakers proposed new rules for Indiana’s poorly-rated virtual schools after years of failing letter grades and calls for them to improve. A measure heard in a House committee Wednesday would help, but many say it’s just a start.

House GOP Blocks Dem Effort To Strengthen DCS Bill

Jan 17, 2019
The Indiana House Chamber. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Indiana House Republicans denied an effort Thursday to compel the Department of Child Services to meet legally-defined caseload standards.

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Lauren Bavis/Side Effects Public Media

Melody Lynch-Kimery had a fairly routine pregnancy. But when she got to the hospital for delivery, she says things quickly turned dangerous.

Verbal Screen Aims To Address Infant Mortality

Jan 16, 2019

A new bill would require pregnant mothers go through verbal substance use screenings was approved Wednesday by a House committee. It also establishes a pilot program to address Indiana’s high infant mortality rate.

Some lawmakers want to keep state money out of schools with openly discriminatory policies, in response to the ongoing controversy over Roncalli High School putting an employee on administrative leave because of her marriage to a woman.

The state has invalidated 2017 ISTEP scores for an entire school in Gary, after an investigation into what education officials are calling one of the biggest cheating cases involving teachers.

Rush Hails Progress In 2019 State Of The Judiciary

Jan 16, 2019
Indiana Chief Justice Loretta Rush delivers the 2019 State of the Judiciary address. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Indiana Chief Justice Loretta Rush hailed better service for what she calls court “customers” during her annual State of the Judiciary address Wednesday.

U.S. Supreme Court Could Hear Indiana Shoreline Dispute

Jan 16, 2019

The U.S. Supreme Court could take on an Indiana legal dispute over who should have access to Lake Michigan’s shoreline. The State of Indiana and a community group both filed briefs on Friday urging the court not to hear the case. 

Gov. Eric Holcomb wants to free up $140 million for schools over the next two years as a way to potentially boost teacher pay.

Nearly two-thirds of Indiana’s high schoolers earn college credit before they graduate, and the state’s Commission for Higher Education (CHE) sees it as a key step toward closing achievement gaps for low-income and minority students.

After Noblesville Shooting Lawmakers Consider Changes to Attempted Murder Law

Jan 15, 2019

Current state statute does not allow 12- and 13-year-olds charged with attempted murder to be sent to adult court – on Tuesday Indiana lawmakers introduced a bill that would change that.

The bill was filed, in part, as a response to last year’s shooting at Noblesville West Middle School where a student shot a teacher and classmate. 

House Committee Approves Bill Making Changes At DCS

Jan 15, 2019
Department of Child Services Director Terry Stigdon addresses a House committee. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

House lawmakers easily advanced a bill out of committee Tuesday that would make changes at the Indiana Department of Child Services.

The bill stems from recommendations by an independent investigation of the agency last year.

While Indianapolis and Bloomington have already created and implemented regulations on electric scooter companies, West Lafayette officials took on the issue of data security in a special meeting Monday night.

New Center Focuses On Social Policy Research

Jan 14, 2019
Breanca Merritt is the director of the new Center for Research on Inclusion and Social Policy. (Photo courtesy of IUPUI)
Jill Sheridan

A new research center will analyze policies and practices related to social factors in Indiana and focus on how disparity impacts the lives of Hoosiers.  

Re-Elected Statewide Officers Sworn In For New Terms

Jan 14, 2019

Indiana’s secretary of state, auditor and treasurer were sworn into office Monday. All three women won re-election bids in November.

Roncalli Counselor Placed on Leave Over Same-Sex Marriage Files Discrimination Charge

Jan 14, 2019

Shelly Fitzgerald, a Roncalli High School guidance counselor, was placed on paid administrative leave last August after her marriage to a woman became public. Now, she’s filed a discrimination claim against the high school and the Archdiocese of Indianapolis.

Fitzgerald took the first step to file a discrimination lawsuit against the Archdiocese of Indianapolis and Roncalli High School last week. Her lawyer David Page says a lawsuit wouldn’t be for personal gain.

Obama-era rules meant to keep farmers from using too many antibiotics seem to be working. According to the Food and Drug Administration, antibiotic sales dropped 33 percent since they went into effect in 2017. That could curb Hoosiers’ resistance to the life-saving drugs. 

Prospective Democratic candidates for municipal races across the state gathered in Indianapolis Saturday for candidate bootcamp. The training is part of a larger strategy to build Indiana’s bench of Democrats.

Indiana has improved some policies to help people with intellectual or developmental disabilities according to a new report.

Indiana is getting millions of dollars in federal funding for early childhood education, and officials say it will help the state strategize to improve early learning programs and access.

(Wikimedia Commons)
Lauren Chapman

Hoosiers who receive food through the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program or SNAP will receive February benefits despite the government shutdown.  The USDA directed states to apply and issue benefits early.

Rep. Mara Candelaria Reardon (D-Munster) speaks to reporters in October after a special prosecutor declined to bring charges against Attorney General Curtis Hill. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

A Democratic state lawmaker has filed a series of bills aimed at Attorney General Curtis Hill, who’s accused of inappropriately groping her and three other women.

The work of the 2019 legislative session began in earnest this week as the governor unveiled his budget, lawmakers debated a revenge porn bill, and hate crimes bill advocates launched a new coalition.

Shutdown Worries: What Happens With Food Stamp Benefits?

Jan 11, 2019

The US Department of Agriculture says despite a partial federal government shutdown that will soon be the longest in history, food stamp recipients will receive benefits through February.  But what happens if the shutdown lasts into March?  As IPR’s Chris Hatfield reports, that has some Hoosiers who rely on those benefits worried.

According to The United Way of Delaware County, 21 percent of households in the area are below the poverty line.  Another 27 percent are in a category where one big emergency expense would slide them into poverty.

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