U.S. Steel

Think Progress website

Today:  On this "Reporters' Roundtable," we ask "Post-Tribune" reporter Meredith Colias-Pete and "Times" business reporter Joseph Pete to talk about the stories they put forth in print and online in their respective media.  Meredith's stories include one of a lawsuit filed by the EPA as it investigates the lead-and-arsenic contamination issue in East Chicago, and Joe Pete covers a lot of news-related ground about U.S. Steel and on the ceremony for Midland Metal Products' moving from Chicago into the old Lear Corp. plant in Hammond.  Lakeshore Public Radio's Sharon Jackson has her conversation with an author about the Maharishi Yogi's influence on the Beatles and their music. Ahd we add to the mix, our conversation with officials with the Hoosier Environmental Council on the agency's bringing "Improving Kids' Environment" into the HEC organization.

The country’s newest national park isn’t like many of the others — it’s surrounded by some of the largest industrial companies in the U.S. While Indiana Dunes’ new designation has drawn national attention, so have recent industrial spills in nearby Lake Michigan waterways.

But will the park’s designation pressure industrial companies to clean up their act? 

U.S. Steel announced Friday the company will idle its East Chicago Tin mill where an estimated 150 workers could face layoffs.

John Luke, AP / AP

NORTHWEST INDIANA - For the second time in two weeks a Northwest Indiana steel company has dumped toxins into a Lake Michigan tributary.

U.S. Steel has reported a discharge of oil Tuesday into the Burns Waterway.  According to the "Times," U.S. Steel reported the discharge after it discovered discoloration in an outfall in the waterway Tuesday morning.  The company said it immediately took samples and contacted local authorities.

The company is currently working to find the source of the discharge and the Indiana Department of Environmental Management is investigating.

Mysterious Discharge Is Just Foam Says U.S. Steel

Dec 4, 2018

A foamy, white substance has been spotted coming out of the U.S. Steel plant in northwest Indiana. It’s flowing into the Burns Waterway — the same Lake Michigan tributary where the company spilled the cancer-causing chemical hexavalent chromium last year. 

Today:   This is Reporters' Roundtable Thursday and we talk to local reporters about their stories posted online and in print.  Doug Ross of the "Times" covers the 2020 end of exemptions for property tax caps for Lake County taxpayers and the impact on local goverments, and Griffith town officials courting two neighboring townships.  Greg Tejeda of the "Post-Tribune" has news on the Gary Common Council meeting on the 2019 budget, Gary-Chicago International Airport and ICE and bedbugs -- and "Times" business reporter Joseph Pete talks about his stories on the U.S.

Indiana State Police Lowell DIstrict

Today:   It's Reporters' Roundtable Thursday.  We hear from Marc Chase of the "Times of Northwest Indiana' about a 20-page special section, coming this weekend, which takes a deep dive into details of 373 fatal traffic accidents that killed 404 people over the past five years in Lake, Porter and LaPorte Counties.   "Times" business reporter Joseph Pete brings us up-to-date on the United Steelworkers Union negotiations with major steelmakers U.S.

Pinterest

Today:    On this Reporters' Roundtable Thursday, we bring in Carole Carlson and Greg Tejeda from the "Post-Tribune" and "Times of Notthwest Indiana" business reporter Joseph Pete to talk about their latest stories offered for readers in print and online.  Carole and Greg focus on news from the city of Gary and Joseph has updates on, among other topics, the United Steelworkers' Union negotiations with U.S. Steel and ArcelorMittal.

Wednesday June 6 is the last day for the public to comment on U.S. Steel’s plans to make up for spilling a toxic chemical into a Lake Michigan tributary last year. But the Environmental Protection Agency says those plans are incomplete. 

Heather Eidson / The Times

PORTAGE, Ind. (AP) — Environmental groups are urging northwest Indiana residents to comment on a proposed federal settlement over a U.S. Steel plant's discharging of a potentially carcinogenic chemical that entered a Lake Michigan tributary.

The Times reports that the public comment period on the proposed settlement ends June 6. Save the Dunes and the Ogden Dunes Environmental Advisory Board will host a public meeting Wednesday about the settlement.

IPB News

Today:  On this Reporters Roundtable Thursday, we bring on "Times of Northwest Indiana" reporters Dan Carden and Joseph Pete and "Post-Tribune" reporters Carrie Napoleon and Greg Tejeda to talk about the stories they covered and wrote for online and in print.

HAMMOND, Ind. (AP) — An environmental group is suing U.S. Steel, alleging that one of the company's northwestern Indiana plants has repeatedly violated its wastewater permit with illegal discharges.

The federal lawsuit filed Wednesday in Hammond by the Chicago Chapter of the Surfrider Foundation contends that discharge violations are ongoing at U.S. Steel's Portage plant and include an April 2017 spill of a potentially carcinogenic chemical.

Nearly 300 pounds of hexavalent chromium entered a Lake Michigan tributary in that incident.

city of Whiting website

Today:   it's Reporters Roundtable Thursday, where we talk with members of the northwest Indiana media about the stories they produced for their print and online readers.  On the program today -- "Times of Northwest Indiana" Statehouse reporter Dan Carden, business reporter Joseph Pete, Lake County government reporter Bill Dolan and "Times" community reporter Ed Bierschenk, who covers stories in Gary, Hammond and -- this week, the latest on the Mascot Hall of Fame in Whiting.

Steelworkers from around the country were in D.C. this week to ask Congress to strengthen its support for the domestic steel industry.

Among them was Billy McCall, who’s worked at U.S. Steel’s huge Gary Works mill for more than 20 years.

He and other United Steelworkers union members talked with federal representatives this week about an ongoing trade investigation into the effect of excess Chinese steel imports on national security.

McCall says that’s about not just defense, but infrastructure and people.