Mara Liasson

Mara Liasson is the national political correspondent for NPR. Her reports can be heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition and All Things Considered. Liasson provides extensive coverage of politics and policy from Washington, DC — focusing on the White House and Congress — and also reports on political trends beyond the Beltway.

Each election year, Liasson provides key coverage of the candidates and issues in both presidential and congressional races. During her tenure she has covered six presidential elections — in 1992, 1996, 2000, 2004, 2008, and 2012. Prior to her current assignment, Liasson was NPR's White House correspondent for all eight years of the Clinton administration. She has won the White House Correspondents Association's Merriman Smith Award for daily news coverage in 1994, 1995, and again in 1997. From 1989-1992 Liasson was NPR's congressional correspondent.

Liasson joined NPR in 1985 as a general assignment reporter and newscaster. From September 1988 to June 1989 she took a leave of absence from NPR to attend Columbia University in New York as a recipient of a Knight-Bagehot Fellowship in Economics and Business Journalism.

Prior to joining NPR, Liasson was a freelance radio and television reporter in San Francisco. She was also managing editor and anchor of California Edition, a California Public Radio nightly news program, and a print journalist for The Vineyard Gazette in Martha's Vineyard, Mass.

Liasson is a graduate of Brown University where she earned a bachelor's degree in American history.

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The lawyer for Christine Blasey Ford wants something more than a she-said, he-said hearing.

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Trump's Week

Jul 20, 2018

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President Trump left the NATO summit in Brussels this week a full 180 degrees from where he came in.

At breakfast with the NATO secretary-general on Wednesday, he called allies "delinquent" over their defense spending and rocked the summit with the charge that "Germany is a captive of Russia" because of its energy dependence.

But as he left on Thursday, Trump was singing a different song, declaring "a very successful summit," stating that "the United States commitment to NATO is very strong."

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President Trump wrapped up a tumultuous appearance at NATO in Brussels with an unscheduled press conference this morning.

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Yesterday, President Trump asked a question on Twitter - what good is NATO if Germany is paying Russia billions of dollars for gas and energy? This morning, when the president was talking about NATO at the NATO summit in Brussels, very different message.

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From NPR News, this is Special Coverage this morning. President Trump has begun an unscheduled news conference in Brussels at the NATO summit. And we're going to turn to the president now.

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The clock is ticking. Last night, a federal judge in California ordered border authorities to reunite separated families within 30 days.

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Donald Trump and his party are gearing up for a hard-fought midterm election. But the president loves to campaign and has already started to raise lots of money and hold lots of big rallies for Republicans.

It's part of a larger playbook that his advisers think can keep the GOP in power this fall, and they think so far it's on track despite the president's tendency to go off script on Twitter or during political speeches.

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Republicans are breathing a sigh of relief after last night's primaries. Here's President Trump at the White House this morning.

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Also listening to this conversation NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson. Hey there, Mara.

MARA LIASSON, BYLINE: Hi there, Audie.

The 2018 election cycle has officially begun, with the first primaries being held in Texas on Tuesday.

In every campaign cycle, analysts look at the fundamentals — the political laws of gravity that, in the past, have influenced elections. In 2016, Donald Trump seemed to defy a lot of these laws, and Republicans are hoping they can do the same this year to prevent the hit that the party in power usually takes in a president's first midterm elections.

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Lawmakers in Washington and Tallahassee have discussed a lot of ideas to reduce school shootings, but on the hardest questions — like what to do about guns — there is just no clear consensus.

There are few signs of clarity from President Trump, who has taken a leading role in the debate without providing strong direction to solve the problem.

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When President Trump delivers his State of the Union address to a joint session of Congress, he'll be giving his assessment of the economy and national security. But occasions like these are also a good time to take a look at the state of our politics.

The state of our politics is...tribal (and mistrustful)

More than ever before voters and politicians seem to be taking sides not according to issues or principles or ideology but according to their political tribe.

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In a surprise meeting with reporters tonight, President Trump said this about the prospect of being interviewed by special counsel Robert Mueller as part of the Russia investigation.

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The president of the United States spent part of Monday addressing what he trusted was a supportive audience - farmers at a meeting in Nashville.

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