2020 Elections

Public Radio WXVU / AP

Today:  It's "Reporters Roundtable Thursday" and "Times" chief political reporter Dan Carden joins us to talk about his stories in print and posted online, including his coverage of the first Indiana gubernatorial debate from Indianapolis and his story on First Congressional District candidate Mark Leyva's comments posted on his Facebook page and reaction to them.  "Post-Tribune" columnist Jerry Davich created what he called a "psychological experiment" and later wrote about it:  he bought and wore Trump and Biden-Harris campaign T-shirts in public for one month.  Jerry talks about the reaction he got from residents at the time and of comments that were posted later to his Facebook pages.  And we complete our four-part series on young Indiana activists from the  "America Amplified: Election 2020" initiative, using community engagement to inform and strengthen local, regional and national journalism. "America Amplified" is a public media initiative funded by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting. 

Duke University

Today:  Republicans and Democrats can't seem to agree on anything these days -- but it wasn't always that way.   Forty years ago, then-U.S. Senators Birch Bayh of Indiana and Bob Dole of Kansas agreed that the country's public research and development system was inefficient and they worked "across the aisle" to fix it.  On today's program, Birch Bayh's son Chris and Joe Allen, one of Bayh's former staffers, talk about the 40th anniversary of the Bayh-Dole Act and its major importance to the U.S. economy.  We bring you the first of a series of Darian Benson's conversations on young women who are pushing for change in their Indiana communities.  And Indiana Public Broadcasting's Justin Hicks spoke with an activist who has turned one block of Main Street in Goshen into a lightning rod for political tension, and perhaps, even conversation.

chicago tribune

Today:   We have Michael Puente's conversation aired on "Off Mic" last week with northwest Indiana political activist Ruth Needleman about the demonstrations outside Gary-Chicago International Airport over the ICE flights out of the area with planeloads of undocumented immigrants.  Indiana Public Broadcasting's Brandon Smith has another pre-Election Day feature on the Governor's race. And Carol Williams, the assistant director of the Hammond Public Library, explains how the library prepared for re-opening after the coronavirus shutdown and is dealing of the changes in programs and the reaction by patrons to what's been done so far.  The library closed for about two months in the spring but re-opened on May 26th.

Lakeshore Public Radio

Today:   Indiana University Northwest economics professor Micah Pollak is with us to talk about the recent study commissioned by I.U. with EMSI, a worldwide provider of economic impact studies to colleges and universities, that explains the economic value that IUN adds to the students and alumni of the university and to the northwest Indiana community at large.  For example: the impact of increased earnings of IUN alumni and the businesses they work for is equal to an economic boost that is similar to hosting the World Series 37 times.  We have another conversation from the Welcome Project at Valparaiso University, and Side Effects Public Media reporter Carter Barrett looks into the struggle that rural hospitals face in trying to bring in enough revenue from a pandemic-stunted economy to stay open -- and serve their communities.  Indiana Youth Institute president-CEO Tami Silverman also reviews her latest monthly column entitled "Talking Politics With Our Kids."  It's an appropriate topic in this "election season." The entire column can be found on the IYI website.

Lakeshore Public Radio

Today:  "Post-Tribune" reporter Carrie Napoleon joins us to talk about her stories in print and online this week, including one about the team of Gary city employees fighting the problem of illegal dumping. The city of Gary is one of the state's biggest cities, area-wise, and has many places where trash and junk can be easily dumped without being detected... until now.   "Inside Indiana Business" host Gerry Dick talks with the president and CEO of the Indiana Restaurant and Lodging Association, Patrick Tamm, about the coronavirus pandemic and its impact on an industry that pumps nearly $15 million into the Hoosier economy every year.  We also bring you Indiana Public Broadcasting's Brandon Smith's interviews with the two candidates for Indiana Attorney General in the Nov. 3rd election -- Todd Rokita and Jonathan Weinzapfel.

Purdue University Ft Wayne

Today:   It's Indiana politics day on "Regionally Speaking."  Andy Downs, the director of the Mike Downs Center for Indiana Politics at Purdue University Ft Wayne, is with us with a pre-Election Day update which includes his thoughts on the latest vote-by-mail decisions, early voting opportunities, the Attorney General candidates on the ballot and concerns about voting equipment security issues.  That is also the subject that Indiana University Public Policy Institute analyst Joti Martin talks about.  The Institute just issued a new analysis that finds that Indiana's reliance on older paperless voting machines could pose security risks in the upcoming election.  And Indiana Public Broadcasting's Brandon Smith has a feature on the 2020 Governor's race and of the three candidates on the ballot. 

FILE PHOTO: Steve Burns / WTIU

Hoosiers have one week left to register to vote for the 2020 general election.

Suzanne Tennant / Post-Tribune

  

Today:  "Times" business reporter Joseph Pete has written another book that looks into the Region in great detail.  This latest book, published by Reedy Press, is titled "100 Things to Do in Gary and Northwest Indiana Before You Die." There will be several opportunities in October to buy and have a signed copy from the author.  Reporter Michael Puente tells us about Latino voters who support President Donald Trump.  We have another conversation from the Welcome Project at Valparaiso University.  And Michelle Fajman, the director fo the Lake County Election and Voter Registration Office, has the latest on the process of preparing for the November 3rd general election.  Thousands of absentee ballots have already been cast and they are expecting thousands more to come in  -- ahead of the early voting period beginning next month.

Photo provided

Today:   Indiana Public Broadcasting's Brandon Smith has an update on the issues surrounding vote-by-mail in Indiana.  The Hoosier State is one of only four states without expanded vote-by-mail for the general election.   Side Effects Public Media reporter Natalie Krebs looks into the issue of data tracking on COVID-19, and how it is being done in some states without help from state of federal health resources.  This is Suicide Prevention Month, and Jesse Brown VA Medical Center's Michelle Langlois talks about the ways to help loved ones and family know warning signs that someone may be in danger of taking ones' life.  And Lakeshore Public Radio's Sharon Jackson talks with Valparaiso city redevelopment director Brandon Dickinson about the old White House Restaurant property.

Rochester Institute of Technology website

Today:  We revisit our conversation with Purdue University Northwest criminal justice professor Nicky Jackson about her October 6th presentation on "Race and Wrongful Convictions," part of the university's series of conversations called  “Race, Racism, Anti-racism” which began earlier this month and continue into November.  The programs are offered on Zoom and Facebook Live.  State Representative Chris Chyung (D-Dyer) was a contestant on a new social media democracy game show series "Internet Expert," produced and put out on YouTube and other media by GBH (Boston).  We talk with Chris and the program's host Malick Mercier, a student journalist.  You can watch it here.   

City of Hobart website

Today:   Hobart Mayor Brian Snedecor joins us to talk about how his city is coping with the coronavirus pandemic, and he explains in detail his reasons for switching political affiliations from Democrat to Republican.  Indiana Youth Institute president and CEO Tami Silverman's produced another public column about helping Hoosier youth during the COVID-19 pandemic and the important role that teachers play in the process.  She talks about the column, as school systems attempt to reopen during the pandemic.  Susan Bannwart, the community engagement manager for the LaPorte County Public Library, explains how its new Mobile STEAM Classroom can help prepare for high-skilled and good-paying jobs in northwest Indiana.  And Brad Miller, the northwest field director for Indiana Landmarks, talks about the latest Ten Most Endangered List and one of this year's additions is Gary Roosevelt High School.  It is one of the three high schools that provided unprecedented learning opportunities to African Americans.

Mark Leyva For Congress website

Today:  Mark Leyva, the Highland resident who is the Republican Party candidate for the First Congressional District seat currently held by Pete Visclosky, is on the program to talk about himself, his position on the issues in his campaign and how he is dealing with campaigning during the pandemic.  We also ask Lake County Surveyor and Plan Commission chairman Bill Emerson to explain the July 15th public hearing on an amended ordinance that, if approved, will set guidelnes for public meetings in the future for citizens to speak out about solar panel farms, if any are proposed for their area. A Chicago company is already interested in putting up a site in south Lake County.  And we we revisit our conversation with Valparaiso Mayor Matt Murphy about this weekend's Fourth of July celebrations in his city.

FILE PHOTO: Brandon Smith / IPB News

Gov. Eric Holcomb and Lt. Gov. Suzanne Crouch delivered their state Republican Party convention speeches in a very different way this year – televised, in the party’s first virtual convention due to COVID-19.

Frank J. Mrvan Facebook page

Frank Mrvan seems to have captured an upset victory in yesterday’s Democratic primary for Northwest Indiana’s congressional seat.

YouTube

HAMMOND, Ind. (AP) — Rep. Pete Visclosky’s choice to replace him after 36 years in Congress won the Democratic primary in the party’s northwestern Indiana stronghold.

WFIU/WTIU

There’s been a new shakeup in the Republican race for the Indiana Attorney General nomination – former Secretary of State and U.S. Rep. Todd Rokita announced his candidacy Wednesday.

Courtesy of the Indiana GOP

The Indiana Republican Party’s 2020 state convention will be virtual. The party officially announced the change Tuesday, in compliance with COVID-19 guidelines.

Politicking

Gary native Jordan Wilson joined “Regionally Speaking” host Chris Nolte to talk about the new mobile app Politicking she co-created with former college classmate Wen-kuni Ceant to help voters streamline everything they need to cast an educated ballot. The app embraces a non-partisan and comprehensive approach to informing users on candidates and issues which they identify. By providing data on local, state and national elections, Politicking enables users to become informed participants at every level of the electoral process.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

A group dedicated to pursuing vote-by-mail for every Hoosier in every election is suing the state to help make that a reality this fall.

Provided / Courtesy of Indiana Prosecuting Attorneys Council and Hoosiers For Adam Krupp

There’s been a shakeup in the Republican race for Indiana Attorney General. Decatur County Prosecutor Nate Harter announced his bid Tuesday while former Department of Revenue Commissioner Adam Krupp dropped out.

Steve Burns / WFIU/WTIU

Republicans on the Indiana Election Commission rejected Democrats’ attempt Friday to loosen some restrictions for the June 2 primary election.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Indiana will hold some in-person voting opportunities for its June 2 primary election.

Indiana Democrats Move 2020 State Convention Online

Apr 14, 2020
Brandon Smith / IPB News

Indiana Democrats will hold their 2020 state convention online amid ongoing concerns about the impact of COVID-19.

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Indiana’s 2020 primary election will move to June 2 in response to COVID-19 concerns.

Gov. Eric Holcomb, Secretary of State Connie Lawson and state party leaders announced the unprecedented change Friday.

Provided / Pixabay

More than 30 cases of novel coronavirus cases have been confirmed in Indiana. The governor announced Wednesday all schools across the state are closed to help combat the spread of COVID-19. And the leaders of Indiana’s two major political parties want all Hoosiers to be able to vote by mail in May’s primary.

Party Leaders Call For Vote-By-Mail

Lauren Chapman, Seth Tackett / IPB News, WTIU

The leaders of Indiana’s two major political parties want all Hoosiers to be able to vote by mail in May’s primary.

Rep. Dan Lipinski, a moderate eight-term Democratic congressman from Illinois, lost his primary on Tuesday to progressive challenger Marie Newman.

Newman, a business consultant and founder of an anti-bullying nonprofit, narrowly lost to Lipinski in a 2018 primary in a suburban Chicago district by about 2 points.

Updated at 11:21 a.m. ET

In the wake of three straight weeks of lopsided multistate losses to former Vice President Joe Biden, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is now "having conversations with supporters to assess his campaign," according to a top aide.

For the third straight primary Tuesday, Joe Biden emerged as the winner.

But the country is in a vastly different state than it was just a few weeks ago, and as a result, the former vice president's victory address on Tuesday night was hardly celebratory.

"Tackling this pandemic is a national emergency akin to fighting a war," the Democratic front-runner said in prepared remarks from his home in Wilmington, Del.

In what have turned out to be the last presidential primary elections in the month of March because of the novel coronavirus, Joe Biden swept all three states Tuesday by big margins and appears well on his way to being the Democratic nominee.

The former vice president won Florida by almost 40 points, Illinois by more than 20 and Arizona by double-digits, too.

It was a remarkable night that adds to Biden's delegate lead that, at this point and because of how Democrats allocate their delegates, looks insurmountable.

Pages