2020 Elections

Lauren Chapman / IPB News

Indiana’s 2020 primary election will move to June 2 in response to COVID-19 concerns.

Gov. Eric Holcomb, Secretary of State Connie Lawson and state party leaders announced the unprecedented change Friday.

Provided / Pixabay

More than 30 cases of novel coronavirus cases have been confirmed in Indiana. The governor announced Wednesday all schools across the state are closed to help combat the spread of COVID-19. And the leaders of Indiana’s two major political parties want all Hoosiers to be able to vote by mail in May’s primary.

Party Leaders Call For Vote-By-Mail

Lauren Chapman, Seth Tackett / IPB News, WTIU

The leaders of Indiana’s two major political parties want all Hoosiers to be able to vote by mail in May’s primary.

Rep. Dan Lipinski, a moderate eight-term Democratic congressman from Illinois, lost his primary on Tuesday to progressive challenger Marie Newman.

Newman, a business consultant and founder of an anti-bullying nonprofit, narrowly lost to Lipinski in a 2018 primary in a suburban Chicago district by about 2 points.

Updated at 11:21 a.m. ET

In the wake of three straight weeks of lopsided multistate losses to former Vice President Joe Biden, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders is now "having conversations with supporters to assess his campaign," according to a top aide.

For the third straight primary Tuesday, Joe Biden emerged as the winner.

But the country is in a vastly different state than it was just a few weeks ago, and as a result, the former vice president's victory address on Tuesday night was hardly celebratory.

"Tackling this pandemic is a national emergency akin to fighting a war," the Democratic front-runner said in prepared remarks from his home in Wilmington, Del.

In what have turned out to be the last presidential primary elections in the month of March because of the novel coronavirus, Joe Biden swept all three states Tuesday by big margins and appears well on his way to being the Democratic nominee.

The former vice president won Florida by almost 40 points, Illinois by more than 20 and Arizona by double-digits, too.

It was a remarkable night that adds to Biden's delegate lead that, at this point and because of how Democrats allocate their delegates, looks insurmountable.

Brandon Smith / IPB News

Democratic gubernatorial candidate Dr. Woody Myers says the General Assembly should be brought in for an emergency session to help address the COVID-19 crisis.

The Justice Department has dropped its prosecution of two Russian firms linked to interference in the 2016 election after accusing them of gaming the U.S. legal system.

The companies, Concord Management and Consulting LLC and Concord Catering, were indicted by special counsel Robert Mueller as part of the investigation into Moscow's campaign of active measures.

While much of the country has come to a standstill because of the rapidly spreading coronavirus, democracy, it seems, goes on.

Four states are set to hold their presidential primaries on Tuesday, and many more states and territories are currently scheduled to vote before the end of April.

Here are answers to three questions you may have about voting in the time of a pandemic.

1. Are elections still happening?

Just before the Democratic debate Sunday, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention put out guidelines encouraging Americans not to gather in groups of 50 or more for the next eight weeks.

2020 Election Calendar

Mar 15, 2020

Super Tuesday has passed, but many events lie ahead in the 2020 election season. Many states still have primaries, and there are more debates, as well as this summer's party conventions.

See NPR's 2020 election calendar for a complete list and to view our coverage of the events as they happen.

Bernie Sanders is staying in the race for president, but he made it obvious on Wednesday that he sees Joe Biden's clear path to the nomination.

"While our campaign has won the ideological debate, we are losing the debate over electability," Sanders said. The recent underdog added that he disagrees that Biden is the stronger candidate to take on President Trump, "but that is what millions of Democrats and independents today believe."

In a visit with Ball State University students in Muncie on Wednesday night, Democratic gubernatorial candidate Josh Owens says the current governor isn’t doing enough for education in the state.  IPR’s Christine Hatfield reports.

Updated at 12:25 p.m. ET

Viewers tuning in for the latest Democratic presidential candidates' debate Tuesday night may sense something missing in Des Moines.

In 1856, Frederick Douglass made a decision. He was an antislavery activist then, hoping to advance his cause by supporting a candidate in that fall's presidential election.

Sen. Cory Booker announced Monday he is dropping out of the race for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination.

In an email to his supporters, Booker cited a number of reasons: most notably, a lack of money to continue.

"Our campaign has reached the point where we need more money to scale up and continue building a campaign that can win — money we don't have, and money that is harder to raise because I won't be on the next debate stage and because the urgent business of impeachment will rightly be keeping me in Washington," Booker wrote.

During the final presidential debate of 2019, one of the moderators posed a question about a topic that rarely gets attention on the debate stage: What steps would candidates take to help disabled people get more integrated into the workforce and their local communities?

For Andrew Yang, the question was both political and personal. His oldest son, Christopher, is on the autism spectrum.

As other candidates report significant increases in fundraising, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren raised $21.2 million in the final three months of 2019, according to her presidential campaign, a drop from the $24.7 million she raised in the previous fundraising period.

The figure is also less than the totals that Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, former Vice President Joe Biden and former South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg took in between September and December.

Campaigns are reporting fundraising in three-month windows.

Updated at 10:30 a.m. ET

Julián Castro, the only Latino candidate in the Democratic field, has ended his presidential campaign.

Castro released a video on Twitter on Thursday, saying that his campaign had "stood up for the most vulnerable people" and had "given a voice to those who are often forgotten."

He adds in the video: "I'm not done fighting. I'll keep working toward a nation where everyone counts."

Castro served as secretary of housing and urban development in the Obama administration and, before that, was mayor of San Antonio, Texas.

Updated at 2:06 p.m. ET

A three-month window that began with a heart attack ended as Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders' strongest fundraising quarter yet.

Sanders' campaign announced it raised $34.5 million in October, November and December — nearly $10 million more than he had raised in the previous quarter. According to the campaign, $18 million came in from 900,000 individual donations in December alone, as Sanders drew larger and larger crowds to rallies in early voting states such as Iowa and New Hampshire.

The divide among Democrats over "Medicare for All" has dominated the policy conversation in the 2020 Democratic primary. But another rift has opened among Democrats, this one about college affordability. The question: Who should get to go to college for free?

South Bend, Ind., Mayor Pete Buttigieg jabbed at his more liberal opponents in a new ad airing in Iowa. It doesn't name other candidates, but it's clear he's taking aim at Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who have pitched plans making free public college available to all.

Purdue University Ag. Economics

Today:  There will be 50 new mayors taking office in 2020 in Indiana cities and towns.   Many campaigned during the elections on promises -- and must now turn those promises into policy.  Purdue University economist Larry DeBoer joins us from his West Lafayette campus office to talk about some of the issues the new mayors will face, and how the Indiana economy has evolved over the years to treat urban, suburban and rural communities differently. He talks about research going into a new formula that he will unveil later this year.  We also have this week's edition of "Building Northwest Indiana" from the Construction Advancement Foundation and another conversation from the Welcome Project at Valparaiso University.

Updated at 9:05 a.m. ET

Candidates seeking the Democratic presidential nomination took to the debate stage for the fifth time Wednesday night. There weren't any groundbreaking or game-changing moments, but here are five things that stood out:

1. Impeachment hearings may have taken some steam out of the debate

Let's face it: The biggest story of Wednesday was not the debate, it was the impeachment testimony of Gordon Sondland, the U.S. ambassador to the European Union.

Former New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg's team filed paperwork for a presidential run on Thursday — but he's not in the race yet.

While Bloomberg's team filed a statement with the Federal Election Commission on Thursday creating a presidential campaign committee, aides to Bloomberg say the move should not be viewed as a final decision or announcement.

The Democratic presidential primary has taken a back seat to the impeachment inquiry over the past few months, so it's fitting that the fifth candidate debate will take place on the same day that the most anticipated impeachment witness, Ambassador to the EU Gordon Sondland, testifies before the House Intelligence Committee.

But a lot more than the path to impeachment has changed since the Democratic candidates last gathered on the debate stage.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick is officially joining the 2020 Democratic presidential race less than three months before voters start casting ballots.

"I admire and respect the candidates in the Democratic field. They bring a richness of ideas and experiences and depth of character that makes me proud to be a Democrat. But if the character of the candidates is an issue in every election, this time is about the character of the country," Patrick said in an announcement video published online Thursday morning.

Indiana Republican Attorney General Curtis Hill, who’s been accused of sexual misconduct by five women, officially announced his re-election bid Thursday.

Klobuchar: Woman with Buttigieg's record would miss debate

Nov 13, 2019

CHICAGO (AP) — Sen. Amy Klobuchar says she and other top female presidential candidates wouldn't be on the debate stage if they had the same experience as Mayor Pete Buttigieg (BOO'-tuh-juhj).

The Minnesota Democrat said Sunday on CNN that she believes the 37-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, is qualified but that she's the better candidate.

Klobuchar says, "I'm the one from the Midwest that has actually won in a statewide race over and over again." She says of the female candidates: "Maybe we're held to a different standard."

Getty Images

Today:  On this "Reporters' Roundtable" Thursday we turn to Dan Carden of the "Times" and "Post-Tribune" reporter Michael Gonzalez to talk about the stories they posted online and had in the print editions this week.  Dan covered the announcement from U.S. Rep. Pete Visclosky that he would not seek re-election in 2020, and of two people who already are interested in seeking the longtime Congressman's seat -- Hammond Mayor Tom McDermott Jr. and North Township Trustee Frank Mrvan.  Dan also has the story about the Schererville town election where Councilman Michael Troxell won the Clerk-Treasurer's race.    Michael was in Portage on Election Night to watch how mayoral candidate John Cannon (who is serving out ex-Mayor James Snyder's term of office) and Sue Lynch did at the polls.  His story in the "Post-Tribune" detailed Lynch's election victory and post-election comments from Cannon.

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