Hate Crimes

Federal and state officials urged local leaders to proactively create plans to address hate crimes in their communities.

Gov. Eric Holcomb says the key to push the measure over the finish line is to “change hearts and minds” in the legislature. (Brandon Smith/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

Gov. Eric Holcomb says “the time is right” for Indiana to pass a hate crimes law – and he’s ready to pitch in to help that effort. 

Holcomb Announces Support For Hate Crimes Bill

Jul 30, 2018
Gov. Eric Holcomb says he'll work to find consensus on hate crimes legislation. (Zach Herndon/WTIU)
Lauren Chapman

Gov. Eric Holcomb announced Monday he’ll support hate crimes legislation in the 2019 session.

The move comes after vandals defaced a Carmel synagogue with anti-Semitic graffiti.

Indiana will remain one of five states without a hate crimes law after the Senate Republican caucus opted not to take a vote on the bill this session.

The hate crimes bill would have allowed a judge to impose harsher penalties if the crime was committed in part because of a victim’s characteristics. One of those characteristics was gender identity – which bill author Sen. Sue Glick (R-LaGrange) says was a significant sticking point.

Senate Committee Begins Debate On Hate Crimes Bill

Jan 23, 2018

Debate on a hate crimes bill was emotional and, at times, heated Tuesday as a Senate committee kicked off conversation on the issue.

Indiana is one of five states without a hate, or bias crimes, law. The legislation would allow judges to impose harsher sentences if a crime was committed in part because of a victim’s characteristics – such as race, religion, sexual orientation, or gender identity.

Advocates Call For Hate Crimes Legislation, Again

Jan 16, 2018

The Central Indiana Alliance Against Hate asked state lawmakers for a hate crime law Tuesday. Similar legislation has failed to pass, each year, for nearly a decade.

READ MORE: Lawmakers Put Burden On Opposite Chambers In Bias Crimes Debate

So far, in this legislative session, two bills would include bias as a consideration for sentencing.

Indiana Youth Group’s Kyle Casteel expressed his frustration with the state’s lack of progress.