Northwest Indiana Food Council

GPTC

Today:  We bring back our conversation with David Wright, the planning director for Gary Public Transportation Corp. about the recent service changes and what will be "On the Table" at the next Legacy Foundation-sponmsored discussion on Monday at Gary Public Library.  Ann Massie of the Northwest Indiana Food Council tells about the last series of "Farm Hop" farm tours around the Region, and Professor Tim Tomasik has details of this year's Valparaiso University Film Festival.  Lakeshore Public Radio's Sharon Jackson also talks with  Allison Mack with Gas Buddy.com about the impact that recent attacks on Saudi crude oil facilities will have on what we here in northwest Indiana pay for gasoline.

Northwest Indiana Food Council website

Today:  Ann Massie with the Northwest Indiana Food Council joins us to talk about the final set of urban and rural farms on this year's "Farm Hop" tour -- an in-depth look into the amazing work being done at family farms, community gardens and other similar projects in the Region.  The final tour will be held on September 21st.  We also talk with Valparaiso University professor Tim Tomasik about the next International Film Festival, and we have another edition of "Green Fleet Radio," with host Carl Lisek, supported by South Shore Clean Cities and NIRPC.

Purdue University Northwest

Today:  A conversation with Richard Rupp, a Purdue University Northwest political scientist who's taken on the position of Chief of Staff to PNW Chancellor Thomas Keon.  We talk about his experiences on campus, including heading up projects that led to the opportunity to serve in a wider leadership capacity on both the Hammond and Westville campuses.

TRI-CREEK SCHOOL CORP.

Today:  Tri-Creek School Corporation in south Lake County is the recipient of a March "Innovators Award" from the Society of Innovators in Northwest Indiana.  Superintendent Debra Howe joins us to talk about the programs that led to the award, beginning with a student-pilot project on solar energy that led to a district-wide program and will save tens of thousands of dollars in energy costs each year -- more than enough to cover the cost of the project.