Obamacare

A Texas federal judge’s ruling could mean Indiana will get back nearly $100 million dollars from the federal government. (Lauren Chapman/IPB News)
Brandon Smith

A Texas federal judge’s ruling this week could mean Indiana will get back nearly $100 million from the federal government.

The lawsuit centers on fees paid through the Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

The ACA requires all health insurance providers to pay a fee – it’s in part how the law funds itself. The law also says states don’t have to pay it.

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Sarah Fentem / Side Effects Public Media

The federal government has granted a one-month extension to Indiana’s Medicaid program, known as the Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0, which was set to expire this month.

This buys time for the state and federal government to finalize details of how the program works, according to a press release from Gov. Eric Holcomb's office. 

Hoosiers Numbers Up As ACA Enrollment Ends

Dec 14, 2017

Friday marks the last day Hoosiers can sign up for health insurance coverage in the Affordable Care Act’s Marketplace.

A flux of people enrolled when the open enrollment started Nov. 1 despite a cut in promotional material.

The enrollment period was shorter this year as President Donald Trump scaled back parts of the Obama-era federal law. Still, early numbers show about 79,000 Hoosiers had picked a plan on the healthcare.gov website through last week. That’s compared to about 71,000 at the same time last year.

It’s the last week for open enrollment on the Affordable Care Act’s health insurance marketplace as the window closes Dec. 15. Health insurance experts say it’s business as usual despite a number of changes that have caused some confusion this year.

A shortened enrollment period is the most obvious difference for people signing up on the Marketplace this year. Reduced promotion and federal fighting over repeal of the law has added to uncertainty says Care Source Indiana’s Steve Smitherman.

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healthcare.gov

Nov. 1 marks the first day of 2018 open enrollment, the period in which people can sign up for insurance through healthcare.gov. The Affordable Care Act has been through the legislative wringer this year, and there are plenty of changes this period for people buying insurance on the marketplace. WFIU’s Becca Costello and Side Effects’ Sarah Fentem answer some open enrollment questions — with the help of some policy experts.

Cancer continues to be a leading cause of death for middle-aged Americans but the number of people seeking care for the disease is increasing.

A newly published paper in JAMA Oncology was co-authored by Indiana University professor Kosali Simon, who says the Affordable Care Act is to thank for an overall 33 percent decline in uninsured new cancer patients.

She says the study begs questions about when a diagnosis is made.

The White House announced late Thursday night the federal government will no longer provide cost sharing reductions for Affordable Care Act insurance plans. Indiana insurers — at least the two still left on the exchange — had been bracing for the news.

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cgpgrey.com

The GOP’s latest Obamacare overhaul proposal could significantly reduce funding for state Medicaid programs and turn expansion plans — including Indiana’s HIP 2.0 — on their heads.

This week, Republicans in Congress will try to rally votes behind a bill that proposes major changes to the way Americans get health care and how much they pay. In Indiana, thousands of Hoosiers could be affected. Use this Q&A to explore how the bill would affect you.

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Indiana GOP Facebook / https://www.facebook.com/indgop/

The Indiana Republican party may have gotten more than it had bargained for after it invited users to share their “Obamacare horror stories” in a Facebook post earlier this week. The GOP account was inundated with thousands of replies from Affordable Care Act supporters from across the country.

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Sarah Fentem and Lauren Chapman / Side Effects Public Media

As Kentucky Senator Mitch McConnell works to drum up votes for his health care bill in Congress, people in his home state worry about what they could lose if the bill passes.

The Indiana Democratic Party says a Congressional vote to repeal and replace Obamacare takes health care away from millions just to fulfill a political promise.

The Republican health care bill includes a trillion dollar tax cut – mostly for wealthier Americans – and cuts billions in government spending. And U.S. Rep. Luke Messer (R-Shelbyville), speaking on the House floor, says, most importantly, it repeals Obamacare.

The U.S. House of Representatives passed the American Health Care Act Thursday afternoon with support from seven of Indiana’s Republican representatives.

But as NPR reports, the bill is likely never to become law, at least as currently written, because the Senate is expected to make significant changes.

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Sonny Abesamis / https://www.flickr.com/photos/enerva/

A newly-released report from the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office predicts 24 million people will lose insurance coverage if the proposed GOP Obamacare replacement passes.

That could have an effect on more than 500,000 Hoosiers.

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Wikimedia Commons

In 2015, Indiana expanded its Medicaid program under the Affordable Care Act. The Healthy Indiana Plan, or HIP 2.0, extended coverage to about 250,000 low-income Hoosiers who were not previously eligible. Amid the turmoil in Washington over what to do with Obamacare, Indiana has applied to keep the program running for three more years.

State Seeks Three-Year Renewal Of HIP 2.0

Jan 31, 2017

Indiana announced it wants the federal government to renew HIP 2.0, the state’s Medicaid expansion program, for three years.

Indiana received a waiver in 2015 to create its own version of Medicaid expansion, HIP 2.0. The program requires people to make monthly contributions to health savings accounts, known as POWER accounts. The current waiver expires a year from now; the state wants to extend that through January 2021.

ACA Supporters Rally At Statehouse

Jan 31, 2017

The rally at the Indiana Statehouse was part of a national “save my care” bus tour sponsored by proponents of the landmark health-care law.

Former U.S. Rep. Baron Hill voted for the ACA in 2010 and says Republicans who now want to replace the Affordable Care Act, ACA, can’t keep its popular parts without keeping the requirement that everyone buy insurance.

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Jim Nix / https://www.flickr.com/photos/jimnix/6168273244

Approximately 1,000 Hoosiers showed up in Indianapolis Sunday to protest congressional efforts to repeal the Affordable Care Act. The rally was organized by a coalition of local and state-wide organizations, including Planned Parenthood, the Indiana Democratic Party and the state chapter of the Democratic Socialists of America.