Superintendent of Public Instruction Jennifer McCormick

Courtesy of Governor Holcomb's office

Gov. Eric Holcomb will appoint Katie Jenner as Indiana's first-ever appointed education secretary. Holcomb announced his pick for the state's top school official in a statement Thursday.

FILE PHOTO: Tyler Lake / WTIU/WFIU News

The Indiana State Board of Education unanimously approved a proposal to maintain full funding levels for schools operating online this fall. School leaders and educators say it offers much-needed stability.

The state’s schools chief has announced what she plans to prioritize during her final year in office.

Starting next month teachers will need to spend time focused on career awareness in order to renew their licenses. More than 22,700 – about a third of all teachers in the state – have started the process to renew their licenses compared to just 514 at this time last year.

The Indiana Department of Education says Indiana’s teacher shortage is counterproductive to its priorities.

Indiana’s governor will appoint the state’s next schools chief under a bill passed by House lawmakers Thursday.

Teacher pay is a key part of Gov. Eric Holcomb’s agenda for 2019, but he says significant raises might not happen for another two years.

Gov. Holcomb’s education plans for 2019 align with what state leaders have already said: Indiana’s budget session will be tight. So when it comes to getting more money in the hands of educators, he says actual raises might have to wait for the 2021 budget.

Indiana’s schools chief says state money shouldn’t go to schools that discriminate, and that it’s a key message she plans to push during the upcoming legislative session.

The state’s top education official plans to push for more policy and funding to improve school safety.

State officials and lawmakers say Indiana has strong school safety programs in place, but Superintendent of Public Instruction Jennifer McCormick says there are still gaps.

Efforts For Lower School Age Fail In 2018 Session

Feb 8, 2018

Legislation to lower the age at which Hoosier children must attend school failed in the General Assembly again this year, but the conversation isn’t likely to end any time soon.

Lawmakers Move Bill To Get More Teachers Into Schools

Jan 31, 2018

With a teacher shortage in the state, lawmakers want to help license more teachers by waiving some testing requirements some educators see as a barrier to getting into the classroom.

Shon Harris says he’s had trouble passing the math requirement for his elementary school teacher license. In part, because it includes material he won’t even teach his fourth grade students.

“It goes all the way up to high school geometry, despite the fact that most of the skills on the test won’t be taught in the elementary classroom,” Harris says.

U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos approved Indiana’s plan to adhere to the federal Every Student Succeeds Act Friday.

Indiana’s 168-page plan details how state officials will comply with the federal Every Student Succeeds Act, which replaced the No Child Left Behind law in 2015.

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Rebecca Green

Parents are among those concerned over new graduation requirements approved by the State Board of Education in December. Parents joined other stakeholders in a meeting held at Northwest Allen County Schools Tuesday night.

Cursive Writing Debate Back At The Statehouse

Jan 4, 2018

The debate about teaching cursive to Hoosier kids has returned to the statehouse, and the lawmaker behind the cursive writing bill has shown no signs of backing down from the issue.

Sen. Jean Leising (R-Oldenburg) has filed legislation every year since 2011 that would require elementary schools to teach cursive, and it’s died every year in the House of Representatives. But Leising says she won’t give up.

“I can’t hardly go anywhere in my district without someone speaking to me about ‘what are you doing about cursive? This is ridiculous,’” she says.