Tim Maloney

Northeast Indiana Public Radio

Today:  Hoosier Environmental Council senior policy director Tim Maloney and his colleagues have been closely watching the progress of bills in this General Assembly session that can affect the Indiana environment.  Tim is on "Regionally Speaking" to talk about the measures that he's been monitoring -- two of which made it through Senate committees.  "Inside Indiana Business" host Gerry Dick and his panel of experts review the week's stories in this "INsiders" segment, and we bring you reporter Michael Puente's "Off Mic" conversation with Gary resident and activist Apostle East on the rise in crime in the Steel City. Lakeshore Public Radio's Sharon Jackson visited south Texas near the Mexico border last year and talked to residents about the controversial issue of immigration.

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Today:   Tim Maloney, the senior policy officer with the Hoosier Environmental Council, talks about the HEC and other groups joining together to encourage state legislators to make sure there are enough funds  in the next two-year budget for some of Indiana's most important conservation programs.  He notes that the President Benjamin Harrison Conservation Trust and the state's Wildlife Action Plan are in need of increased financial support.  Neither programs have been adequately funded since 2008.

Plans For Lawrenceburg Coal Ash Pond Could Get Revised

Oct 8, 2018

The Indiana Department of Environmental Management says a recent federal appeals court ruling could change closure plans for a coal ash pond in Lawrenceburg. 

Today:   The Center for American Progress just completed a study of voter turnout, based on individual states' efforts in 2016 and projected the opportunities for more people to get to the polls in this mid-term election -- and beyond.  Danielle Root of the CAP joins us to talk about the report, and how thousands more Hoosiers could vote, with just a few changes to voter registration, same-day registration and no-excuse absentee voting. 

A change to the Endangered Species Act could harm plants and animals in Indiana that are awaiting federal help. A proposal by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service would get rid of blanket protections for all species that are close to becoming endangered or “threatened.”